Re: using instant glue to stop wood-rot spores from germnating?

It might work but why guess? I'd be more inclined to identify the culprit and deal with it directly. If you can isolate areas that contain the offending fungi and spores you could make contact with someone knowledgeable, perhaps at a university in your area with a good biology department or forestry department. If they could grow the material they could help evaluate the effectiveness of various toxic remedies. Most home inspectors do not have specific knowledge, the have opinions.
It may well be that something else is easier to apply and more effective than cyanoacrylates. A quick Google search yielded the site below that suggests that for at least one species borates are effective.
http://www.novaguard.com/fungus.html
Good luck.
Phil
Barclay wrote:

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Check out http://www.microban.com/ . They make coatings that contain selenium which is antibacterial and anti fungal.
Sam

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Sam Hopkins wrote:

It's also great for making certain species of aliens explode on contact.
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It's funny that you say that because just the other day I tossed some on one because I was out of water and sure enough he exploded.
Sam

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Generally, fungus requires moisture to grow. If the wet conditions are removed, the rot will slow or stop. You can, like a surgeon removing cancer, simply cut out and remove the rotted part and sister onto the remaining solid portion. Use pressure treated or other rot resistant wood as a replacement. Bleach will kill most rot/mold.
If indeed the rot is due to other causes (rather than from a leaking washing machine hose, then that problem needs to be solved first. Basically if you keep the wood dry you should be ok.

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pixelated:

Is that CA-OSHA approved, WeeGee?
(You and I both know that ain't CalOSHA, neither.)
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scribbled

Check out the MSDS for Bora-Care - pretty benign, other than the antifreeze. http://www.nisuscorp.com/pdfs/boracaremsds.pdf
Note that, according to the MSDS:
"None of the major constituents have been identified as carcinogens or probable carcinogens by IARC or OSHA."
BTW, no OSHA in CA (not Cal). We do have Occupational Health and Safety units in provincial/territorial governments or workers compensation boards, as well as an equivalent federal one for industries under federal jurisdiction (e.g banking, transport, telecommunications) but no overriding federal agency.
Luigi Replace "no" with "yk" twice in reply address for real email address
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