Re: Need help - lacquer run!

snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

Shave the run down with a sharp chisel, then polish the run out. . .Some wet/dry paper in 1200 grit very lightly, and then some auto polish. Practice on a piece of scrap first ;~)
Kim
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I have to weigh in on Kim's suggestion. Heavy runs have a very bad habit of not completely curing inside and trying to sand them can turn things into an unholy mess.
Shave off the run, sand lightly and follow with auto compound then auto polish.
An option after shaving is to tape off an area around the damage, use an irregular shape, an elongated diamond shape with the long points parallel to the grain is good, and start laying in light coats of deft from a spray can.
When you have a small build you can work it with the automotive products feathering the edges of the diamond.
I advise the diamond shape because, like a Dutchman, it blends easier then a rectangle that has defined cross grain lines. They really stand out and are hard to hide.
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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Hi All, Don't know much about lacquer but with varnish runs are best dealt with using a very sharp cabinet scraper. If used carefully, only the run will be removed and the surface can be touched-up perfectly. Dave

a
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IIRC, we had something similar to this a few months back on the wRECk, and someone came up with a tool specifically made to deal with runs. May be wrong here, but seems to me it was an "automotive" finish tool that used your standard single edge razor blades, acted like a miniature plane to shave off runs in a finish. Anyone welse recall this? Nahmie

noticed
Deft,
about
that
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This fellow is exactly correct. If you go too far, instead of spraying the additional finish, just brush it on then after a few coats use 400 grit or something finer to block sand the local area then buff. Trust me, I was a auto body man for years, and I has sure paid off when finishing wood. Has worked for me for years. Use a hard block to sand , and sand lightly in a random manner.
Ken
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If you use a double edge razor blade, tilt it a little and bend it, the corners will be lifted up so they don't cut the wood and you will be using only the center of the blade. You can use it this way pushing away from you or drawing it to you.
Put some masking tape on the other edge.
Stewart
"Norman D. Crow" wrote:

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WRONG!!!
I would NOT try and scrape or plane the run. One small mistake and you are into the wood and now you have a much bigger problem with the color involved. With Varnish you have to scrape but with Lacquer you can use different methods.
I "polish" runs out of lacquer all the time (I am not too good with the gun). The nice thing about lacquer is that thinner will always open it back up.
I would: Get a lint free cloth, saturate it with lacquer thinner and slowly rub out the run, applying more thinner as it evaporates to keep things slick. You may rub through to the wood in places but no problem.
Then recoat the area by brushing with thinned lacquer at least 50% thinner and if you have any retarder available (the kind to avoid blushing, not the non-flash type) add some in to help leave the lacquer open for the brush lines to settle out. Using a good 2" brush recoat the area. Stroke only once or twice and on the final stroke keep the brush at 90 degrees to the surface, this minimizes brush strokes. (lay the piece on it's back if you can)
Feather the first coat a few inches past the effected area. You can recoat in 1-2 hours, no sanding in between. Put the second coat closer in, etc.
Let it dry completly (2 days at least). Then CAREFULLY wetsand it with 320, then 400 staying away from any edges, then hit the entire area with steel wool or whatever method you used as a final step originally.
If you waxed it before make sure you clean it with Naptha first. If you wax it now, that can be the final step to completly hide any differences left for the eye.
BW
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (TopekaRyan) wrote in message

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WRONG?
You may have another preferred approach to removing runs but, because you either dislike or can't accomplish the task of slicing away or scraping a run that doesn't make it wrong.
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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about
alone
I KNEW I remembered the subject of shaving runs came up once before! Keeter posted a URL to the website last year. Just looked it up, found this:
http://www.eastwoodco.com/itemdy01.asp?T14007&Dep_Key1=Paint
Nahmie
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