Re: Japanese rip saw technique


RichardS Wrote: > "Hoyt Weathers" snipped-for-privacy@hiwaay.net wrote in message

> it?

> on--

> and-

> board

Hello. I don't own a Japanese saw yet, but with Google am trying to learn. Am I missing something or couldn't you approach the board and draw the saw like a Samurai would draw a sword? When the board becomes to close instead of reaching (potentially dangerous to a Samurai), straddle the board with legs and arms. Anything I should avoid in purchasing a first saw from the internet?
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grasshopper


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On Sat, 9 Apr 2005 09:57:58 +0100, the inscrutable grasshopper

The $25.95 (delivered) Razor Saw from www.japanwoodworker.com is a great deal for a versatile saw. The Ryoba saw has a rip tooth config on one side and a crosscut config on the other, and both have decreasing tooth count toward the far end. This means that they cut finer close to your hand, coarser toward the end of the pull stroke. It's a great concept and works very well in practice.
The Gyokucho 9-1/2" Double Edge Saw (Ryoba Noko Giri) 19.610.0 is what I got from them. I would have ordered the slightly finer-toothed hardwood saw if I'd known they had a choice. If you order one, see if they'll let you have a 19.611.0 hardwood saw instead. 1-800-537-7820 (standard disclaimer applies)

With the Japanese "saw on a stick" config, you hold it as you would a carving knife, but with the index finger pointing toward the blade. Once started, they can be held any way you like. I have used mine recently on a neighbor's project (cutting birdhouses from a downed oak) vertically, in a milk-churn style grip. These things are faster than my minty fresh Disston rip or crosscut saws. I'm amazed and sold on the Japanese saw style.

Watch the prices. The really good saws go for upwards of $200 while the worthless saws go for under $20. Anything priced between those limits should get you a good saw, But staying with known entities is always a good choice, too. Lee Valley, The Japan Woodworker, Misugi are all good names.
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On Sat, 09 Apr 2005 07:53:52 -0700, Larry Jaques wrote:

I would add that a sub-20 saw might be a good first saw. Why? Because they are different there are different motor skills to learn and expectations to revise. I learned the hard way that those itty-bitty teeth will chip off if you let the saw hit the bench as the cut finishes. I'd hate to have learned that lesson on a more expensive saw. I learned the hard way that hardwood is tough on Japanese saws.
Folks here have given good reviews for Tashiro's saws: http://www.tashirohardware.com/ , when you want to try something a little different.
On topic, I picked up an Irwin (evil outcast unclean) kataha noko giri for 40% off, just for fun. Man, that thing whizzes through wood. Not a finishing saw, for sure.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

I have some of the "Plastic Versions" from Lee Valley. They work very well indeed.
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Will
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