Re: How should someone get started in woodworking?



I got started working with Dad and Grampa, but that was 40 years ago... Today, I'd look for a course that would produce a completed project at the end of it.
djb
--
"I'm a man, but I can change... If I have to... I guess." -- Red Green

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If a course is available take it
Go to library, check out some books, read same. Buy copies of the ones you are comfortable with.
Go to news stand/bookstore. Buy every woodworking magazine they have. subscribe to the ones you feel comfortable with.
Order every free catalog you find offered in the magazines
Buy Weekend woodworking projects (I think that is what the title is).
When you are not studying the books and magazines try some of the simpler projects in the Weekend magazine.
Buy only the tools you need for those projects preferably restricting yourself, for the time being, to hand tools..
Do not spend any large sums of money on any power tools until you truly understand and do not have to ask what the difference between a jointer and planer is or which you should buy first.
Good luck
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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Learned some of the basics from my dad as a kid but had no interest till 45 years later, so I'm a beginner.
I picked up a lot of info (joinery, milling finishing) from many of the shows on TV (NWY for a lot of encouragement, DIY woodworks for inspiration and how to do it right. DIY Woodworking to see if I can find the mistakes), woodworking magazines (for tips and a number of projects that I thought I could tackle), books (Library and purchase for specifics on dust collection, bandsaws, routers) and the Central New Jersey Woodworkers Association for hands on demos. This group has answered many of my specific questions over the past 3 years.
Start with projects requiring straight cuts and simple joinery; shop cabinets, workbench, jigs. Buy tools as you need them for a project.
Take your time. It's a great hobby and the experienced people on this group have a wealth of information they're willing to share
Enjoy
Ken

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Find something you want to build. Something practical that actually has a use and not too complicated. maybe a birdhouse?
I mean, we don't have all these tools just to use them for use's sake.
--Except maybe for the relaxation of turning on a lathe, or just the pleasure of taking off translucent strips o wood with a finely tuned plane, or...
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I shut down my upholstery business, went to the local trade school, took a year of the carpentry course. (My husband held the fort down while I was in school) From there was hired by Habitat for Humanity as the construction coordinator. Built a couple of houses with them, felt I was ready to tackle my own project. Built my own house, literally, myself. Including door and window frames and cabinets. There is not one prefab thing in my house. Now I am ready to tackle something techical and tricky like dovetails. Just jump in feet first. Be prepared to make a few mistakes, but keep a sense of humor and have fun. Safety first, always. Perry bentcajungirl
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This is interesting. Because I use a wheelchair, I'm not inclined to build an entire house by myself, but I dream of having the shell of a house built and then locking myself inside with my tools and constructing the rest.
All the rest, cabinets, interior walls, most furniture etc. and design aspects I would build myself. What would you suggest as a minimum for the shell of a house? I was thinking of heating, plumbing and possibly insulation since I live in a snow environment a number of months of the year.
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It's not about all the tools, just practice and more practice. I look back on things I made 30 years ago, and they almost look pitiful but that birdhouse is still being used today!
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Sun, Jul 27, 2003, 11:47pm (EDT+13) snipped-for-privacy@gol.com (Lou) puts out: I don't have any woodworking experience, but it looks rewarding. How should I get started? Should I buy a few books, some basic tools, and learn by trial and error? Should I take a course? How do most people get started?
Depends. What kinda woodworking? Go to your local library.
JOAT Always put off until tomorrow something which, tomorrow, you could put off until, let's say, next year. - Lady Myria LeJean.
Life just ain't life without good music. - JOAT Web Page Update 23 Jul 2003. Some tunes I like. http://community-2.webtv.net/Jakofalltrades/JOATorJackOfAll/page4.html
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Thanks for your advice, everyone. I'm in Japan right now and have neither the opportunity to take a course nor the space to set up a shop. When I get back to the US later this year, I'll look for a course. Until then, I'll get some books and magazines and browse the Internet. I learned a lot last night reading some woodworking articles on the Popular Mechanics Web site. I'm looking forward to building the Popular Mechanics humidor.
Lou

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Locale is an important tidbit. If you are in or got to Tokyo, go down to Tokyu Hands and poke around. The tool selection is interesting (a little different than Western selections at BORGS or WW specialty shops). Maybe you could pick up some small carving knives to play with -- takes almost no space to carve. Also, search out local artisans and talk to them, see their work and their methods of work. Hit some temples and see if you can figure out how they were constructed --- lots of M&T joinery to be found. I was in Tokyo last fall for a conference; wished I had more time outside of meetings to poke around. The fishmarket was a really wild scene.
hex -30-
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Lou,
I've been in woodworking for a year now. Still have most of my tools on the ground (no benches yet), so I've got a long way to go, but I do have a table saw, miter saw, router table, and jointer. I've found Frank Klausz's videos to be totally awesome. Magazines are great -- woodsmith was my first that I built a project from (TV Stand).
My biggest piece of advice (looking back after a year) is to go to all the websites that list accident reports (I'll stick my favorite at the bottom). It's important to know what not to do as well as what to do. I've done a number of the things that cause missing fingers, etc and been lucky so far. But now that I know better, I don't do them anymore, and I understand WHY.
Good luck and enjoy the shavings!!
Mike
http://www.woodworking2.org/AccidentSurvey/search.htm

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Classes are good,hands on trial and error is priceless.Start now with home projects and when you feel the need take a class.Start with easy yard funiture then fancier jointed furniture as your skills mature.
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Yeah I checked all around Knoxville with no luck. I'll call Woodcraft and see what they recommend.
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I'm about an hour South of Knoxville and have been to that store several times .. .. .. I think they cycle through the classes they offer from time to time .. .. ..
DMcKinney37 wrote:

-- I AM NOT PARANOID .. .. .. but EVERYONE thinks I am !! !! !!
<<<__ Bob __>>>
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