Re: Chair Reproduction Saga - proposed seat choice finalized!

If you've been following along, the goal is to do a fairly accurate reproduction/capture the feel, times six, of the following chair, beloved by SWMBO, but perhaps with a bit of modern updating:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/MysteryChair1a.jpg
The poplar "prototype" chair, which I made first to work out the joinery details, was used to further model, and hopefully solve, a protracted spousal struggle over the seat choice/design:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/CrftsManCh18.JPG
... which had the effect of just further fueling the controversy.
Now here is one of the new QSWO chair frames (1 of 6 awaiting resolution of same controversy), equipped with a "prototype" wooden seat (once again of poplar, but stained with the same stain so as not to throw my colorblind eye off too far with the huge contrast of stained/unstained wood):
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/CrftsManCh22.JPG
Lesson Learned: Never underestimate the value of "prototyping, for it is what finally convinced SWMBO of my superior wisdom in the matter. <d&r>
_We_ are going with the wooden seats, with the only difference being that they will be made of 1 1/4" thick QSWO, instead of the 3/4" thick poplar in the last photo above.
... and Thanks to Leon for researching/providing me the location/phone numbers of all the known hardwood dealers between Hot Springs, AR and Houston, TX (while I was stranded in the former for two days this week without online access), enabling me to find some nice QSWO for the wooden seats, on what would have otherwise been just a long, monotonous drive home.
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Sat, Oct 14, 2006, 9:39am (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Swingman) doth show and tell: <snip> Lesson Learned: Never underestimate the value of "prototyping, for it is what finally convinced SWMBO of my superior wisdom in the matter. <d&r> <snip>
Pretty damn spiffy.
At least one pro furniture maker "always" makes prototypes, out of cheaper wood of course. And later sells the prototypes, once he's done with 'em.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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"J T" wrote in message

Makes good sense all the way round.
In this case, the practice of prototyping both "sold" SWMBO on the type of seat I wanted, and she got to keep the original prototype, with the upholstered seat, for her desk.
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Sat, Oct 14, 2006, 11:51am (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Swingman) hath scribeh thusly: <snip> In this case, the practice of prototyping both "sold" SWMBO on the type of seat I wanted, and she got to keep the original prototype, with the upholstered seat, for her desk.
That's as good as money any day.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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Swingman wrote:

The seat looks like slats inset across it. Will you explain why you designed it is way? I'm wondering if it was for comfort or if the design was more pleasing to you than a solid seat. I have never seen a chair with this kind of seat before. Living in the hot old deep south it might be something to keep in mind to cool hot bottoms.
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Here's the story on the chair:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/Projects10.htm
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I know that this is totally unrelated, but I am reminded of a guy who used to make pack frames for hunters when I was growing up. The hunters would get their deer, field dress them and haul out the meat on their backs. They needed something that they could tie an unwieldy quarter of half deer to their backs. Most of them used an army surplus pack frame.
But this old guy made these frames that had about 60 nylon cords that went across the back. And everyone said it was the most comfortable packframe for unwieldy loads that they had ever tried. Something about each cord handling a percentage of the load.
Not a direct corollary, I know, but there may be more to this slat arrangement than meets the eye.
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Swingman wrote:

Looks nice, good job. Was the slat thickness primarily an esthetic or structural decision?
R
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"RicodJour" wrote in message

More in keeping with the original chair design..
The original chair has a 1 1/8" thick seat, which was likely more a case of "material on hand" or esthetic, than a structural issue.
Then again, I am always amazed at what a difference a small change in material thickness makes in pleasing designs, and, as a result, I've been trying for the past couple of years to get away from the "3/4 syndrome" that pervades much of woodworking today.
I have currently changed the slat width to 3/4" and the thickness of the seat to 1 1/4" ("material on hand" once again) in an new prototype just to see what it looks/feels like, plus I want to experiment with a larger round-over radius on the sides of the seat frame, as well as a different round-over radius on the slats themselves.
While the latter may have a comfort component, these are basically esthetic issues that I want to be perfectly satisfied with prior to completing the project.
I do have a completion deadline, so I'll have to quit futzing with it after this seat thickness issue is decided and "git r done".
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