Re: Argh!!!! Sketchup



Start a rectangle, left click to start and drag the rectangle in the direction you want it to go, then type 2.24,4 and enter,
Now select the push pull icon or type "P". Click the rectangle surface and pull or push and then type .125 or 1/8 and enter. done deal
Now if every thing is too small with your initial rectangle click on the zoom extents icon and every thing in the drawing will zoom to fill the screen. The zoom extents icon is a magnifying glass and 3 red arrows.
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One other thing. once you have that rectangle full screen save that drawing and use that drawing as your start template/file for each new drawing. That way you can see those small parts immediately.
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OK, I was not sure of what you wanted exactly. IIRC you did not mention the 2" height.
Anyway, draw your rectangle again but use 2.25, .125 and enter. The rectangle should be laying flat. Now pull it up 2 and enter. You now have one side to the box. NOW make it into a component. NOW select everything by double clicking all of it or click dragging to select all of it. Type G and give it a name or press enter.
Now another rectangle starting at the bottom corner of the previous component and going in the appropriate direction. Rectangle 2.75, .125. Pull 2 enter. Make into another component.
See where we are going here?
If no success, call me tomorrow and we can do this together at the same time on our computers.
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Mike I'll be happy to help any way I can. BUT we may have company tomorrow night and or Friday night. I know that sounds iffy but the company will be our son and his friends. You now how young'ns schedules go, and you don't pass up an opportunity to see them.
Just saying.
Shetchup is a bit difficult to start learning on. Once you understand the basics everything seems to make more sense. The program is absolutely worth the effort and is way more capable and easy to use than I thought when first learning. Oddly some of the difficult tasks that gave me trouble turn later to be simple to perform.
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message wrote:

You could sort of do that...
1. Make your rectangle.
2. Use the offset tool to make another rectangle inside the first, offset by 1/8. To do that, select the offset tool, click inside the box, move the cursor and type 1/8.
3. Now select the outside rectangle - your soon-to-be wall - and use push/pull to pull up the 1/8" wall to the height desired. _________________
Remember that you can push/pull in two ways...
1. push/pull the selected surface
2. push/pull a COPY of the selected surface. To do that, select push/pull and press Control; the P/P icon will now have a plus in it.
The diference is, if you P/P as in #1, you wind up with a hollow wall; via #2, a solid one.
--

dadiOH
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message

My pleasure. Keep in mind the fact that you do NOT have four walls; you have one wall forming a rectangle. That may well be all you need but, for example, you wanted to make one "wall" taller or shorter you could not do so in the existing form...you would have to separate the "wall" you wanted to change, simply done by drawing two lines, one each where it meets the perpendicular walls at the ends.

IIRC, he was suggesting drawing another rectangle inside the first. Or, maybe, drawing another rectangle appropriately sized elsewhere and then moving it into the original, larger rectangle. It could be done either way but using offset is easier. ________________
One thing Leon mentions frequently is to MAKE COMPONENTS. He is right!!!! If you don't, you are going to have stuff sticking together and things will get deformed if/when you try to modify them.
It does take some thought to decide how much and what should be included in the component; much depends upon what you are making. Take your box for example...
You now have a bottom which has no thickness and a wall around the perimeter. If that bottom was destined to be a floor, it should become a component; doing so would allow you to modify the thickness or size and to place other objects on it without affecting anything else. If the walls of your box were to become walls of a house, they too should become one or more components. All components together could become a group.
To make those separate components as now drawn, you would have to select the things NOT to be included in the component, hide them, select what is left and "componentize" them. That can be made easier by creating and using layers as you draw items; make a layer called "floor", make it the active layer and draw the floor. Make another layer called "walls", activate it and draw the walls. You can then hide any layer. I alway have a layer named "notes" and another for "dimensions"; they are usually hidden to hide the clutter until I want it.
I also (usually) preface component and layer names with a number...eg, 10 floor...11 walls. In this case, all structural things would begin with "1n", makes it easier to find them as they sort alphabetically. If I were making doors/windows in the walls, they might become "20 SW window...20 E window...21 entry door...21 passage door".
--

dadiOH
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On 12/26/2013 8:19 AM, dadiOH wrote:

And just to make this a bit more clear, you can edit a component at nay time should you not draw it completely or correctly when you make it into a component. Simply double click it.
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I was trying to explain, my second round, how to do it with separate sides.
More simply you can simply take your cube and draw a rectangle on the top side. Draw it 1/8" smaller than the top. Or offset the outer perimeter lines with the offset icon and choose 1/8".
Now push that inner square/rectangle in.
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Use the center mouse wheel and you can zoom as much or little as you wish. You can use the wheel regardless of what tool is active.
--

dadiOH
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On Wed, 25 Dec 2013 22:14:41 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

Make another cube, offset by your 1/8" (and smaller by 1/4") inside that cube. Delete the center. Or better, if you intend to actually build this box, make the walls as you would make the box.
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