Rawhide mallot

I found that an old rawhide hammer given to me years ago became one of my most used hammers. I have a plastic dead blow hammer, but there are many times I use the rawhide mallet when I need something smaller and need to deliver a soft blow. I've used it for tapping the chuck into the drill press, knocking together joints, driving a center onto stock for turnings, etc. I have an all wood mallet, but that rarely gets used and is not soft like the rawhide. I was wondering what other woodworkers use.
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I have several weights each of rawhide, wood, rubber with and without deadblow shot in 'em and brass. the most used are probably the biggest wood one and the biggest rawhide one.
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I use my Tandy Leather rarhide mallet also... the half that the dogs didn't use as a chew toy anyway... Rubber comes in handy too.
Will
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stated wide-eyed, with arms akimbo:

Do you now have a hide rug in the shop?
-- Vidi, Vici, Veni --- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
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Snip!! I was wondering what

I have a wooden mallet that I made myself (one of my first projects), a rubber mallet and a dead-blow mallet. My wooden one has a Jatoba head which makes it heavy and hard, but not too hard. It's my go-to mallet for almost everything, but there's probably some sentiment influencing that.
Ed
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Thu, Jun 3, 2004, 1:34am (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@noone.com (Phisherman) gurgled: I found that an old rawhide hammer <snip> I was wondering what other woodworkers use.
I've got one rubber mallet (for some unknown reason) and 7 turned carving type mallets I made when I got my wood lathe. Seldom use the rubber mallet, usually use one of the smaller/lighter turned mallets. They range from a small, quite light one, made from a downed pine tree on my property, up to a large, heavy, dogwood one, of several pounds, also from my property. Dog got ahold of maybe the lightest one, and chewed it up some, but still usable. I plan on getting a dead-blow hammer, mostly for some metal working I'm planning on. Other than that, I'll be using my homemade mallets. If I ever need another, all I'll need is a chunk of wood big enough, and maybe 5 minutes. Oh, yeah, they're all from trees on my property, and are pine, holly, dogwood, and, I believe, a couple out of hickory, and maybe oak. I highly recommend making some. I made one of the laminated hammer type mallets - once - and would never make another - or want to use one again. The round type are much handier, and much easier, and faster, to make. No plans needed, just a wood lathe. Or you could bandsaw or scrollsaw something similar out of a 4X4 or 2X4. No prob.
I drilled a hole in the end of the handles, with a rawhide loop, so I could hang them. I think better to just make a small open bin and just stack them in there. Quicker, and easier, to get to that way.
And, make them flat on the big end. That way you can stand them up. Handy. If you're worried about them rolling (i'm not), just pine, or sand, a flat edge on them.
JOAT If you're offered free wood, take it, period; figure out what to use it for later. - JOAT
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Phisherman writes:

I've got a couple of rawhide mallets with replaceable (weighted) heads that are really great for assembling drawers and similar constructs. I've got an unweighted rawhide mallet, too. It is less great because it hasn't got enough weight behind it for its face diameter, but can serve with light boxes. For bumping tablesaw (and other iron) tops around, I've got a mallet that has a rawhide face on one side, copper on the other. Works really great.
Charlie Self "The test and the use of man's education is that he finds pleasure in the exercise of his mind." Jacques Barzun
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I only got one of these recently. Mainly I use it for coppersmithing. Anything heavier or harder, including lignum vitae or boxwood, can leave edge marks in freshly-annealed copper.
My woodworking assembly hammer is a _white_ rubber mallet that I keep just for assembling cabinets, and definitely keep clean.
General hitting is done by black rubber mallets (useless, but cheap), a few sizes of shot-filled plastic mallets (lovely things - much more controllable), and for heavy stuff there are Thor hammers (common in England) with cast iron heads and inserted faces in either rawhide or copper. These put a lot more mass into a smaller space.
One of my favourite woodworking hammers is an 8oz Japanese hammer with a square-faced head. You can get much closer to a face or corner with this than you can with a round face, less risk of accidental dents too. Highly recommended.
Over the water there's a 8lb sparkproof bronze sledgehammer. For when you want to really smash something, but to break it carefully.
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