radial arm saw vs. compound miter saw

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the only advantage of radial arm saws over a cms seems to be the ability to cut wider material
they also are a little more squirrely and i would not say they require more vigilance but they can require more force to prevent from running
would not consider buying a radial arm saw but maybe they still have a place in the woodshop
if they do how do they fit in
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The radial arm saw can also rip. A miter saw, slider or not, can not. Also, when not in use the radial arm saw provides more storage/assembly area.
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On Fri, 15 Jul 2016 15:00:42 -0500

forgot they can rip and that is a big difference
but i am not sure if that is a big enough selling point for potential purchasers
i have never ripped on a radial arm saw but i guess in a pinch it is a useful feature but i would not make it my go to method for ripping
of course you could rip thicker material than a skil saw
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On Fri, 15 Jul 2016 15:00:42 -0500

in the war department manual i linked to there are pictures of an old dewalt radial arm saw and it looks like they attached a router bit to it and used it sort of like a shaper
they also show it being used for ripping and plowing
i had never even heard of plowing in woodwork context so that is a new term for me
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It's usually spelled "ploughing" in this context, and now-a-days is usually only used when referring to cutting a groove with a handplane (which, predictably, is called a "plough plane").
John
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Like my trusty Stanley #46, which can plow dadoes[*] in addition to grooves. <http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan7.htm
[*] Using knickers to prevent tearout.
Or these, which come in both right-hand and left-hand versions:
http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?pt089&cat=1,230,41182
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Spoken like someone who has never used a RAS.
You can't dado (as opposed to grove) with a CMS.
You can't rip with a CMS.
You can't put a moulding cutter on a CMS.
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On Fri, 15 Jul 2016 20:17:32 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

There is a ton of things you cannot do with a slider. Not the least of which is to use it as a sander, or buffer.
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On 7/15/2016 2:17 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

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On Fri, 15 Jul 2016 18:20:21 -0600, Just Wondering

The only big advantage of the RAS is its required floor space. They can be stuck up against a wall, which *really* limits the utility of a table saw.
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So what? The OP compared a RAS to a CMS, not a tablesaw.
In any case, I'd much rather dado a wide panel on the RAS than the TS.
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On 7/18/2016 9:58 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Actually I have done both, wide dado's on a RAS and a TS. I do many on the TS and IMHO a wide panel along with the rip fence and proper precautions is easier to accomplish than with a RAS. A RAS does have its limits, putting a dado on a 24" wide panel on a TS is a piece of cake. Dado's on narrow panels with a miter gauge is also pretty easy using the rip fence as a repeatable stop.
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Not when it's 84" long (e.g. a bookshelf side).
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On 7/18/2016 11:18 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Actually I have done this on almost 96" long panels. I have a 50+" rip capacity so getting to the middle of an 8' long panel is no issue.
Take a look here. This was approximately 94" long with 3 dado's on each long panel. https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/25716109020/in/dateposted-public/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/25445144394/in/dateposted-public/
This was approximately 8' wide with a dado dead center and near the ends on the bottom and top panel, 24" deep.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/26176815890/in/dateposted-public/
And this was right at 8' wide with dado's for the dividers between the side cabinets and the center. Never mind the French model in the picture. :!) https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8539981330/in/dateposted-public/
Actually I build a lot of cabinets with front and back face frames. All plywood panels lock together with dado's and groves and dado's in the mating sides of the front and back face frames have to also align with all of those panels. So accuracy is very important for the x,y,z components and dado's/groves to all come together at the same time.
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We'll have to agree to disagree. Cross-cutting six or seven dados on a 84" (or 96")x16 shelf support is a pain on a tablesaw, particularly if one is space-constrained. Much easier to simply slide it along on the RAS extensions (which double as workbench surface).
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On 7/18/2016 11:21 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    >>

support the work coming off a table saw. I fail to see how, if you're sliding a long board across a sawblade, it's easier to slide it on a RAS table than on a table saw table.
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On 7/18/16 8:26 PM, Just Wondering wrote:

I'm sorry, but your failure to see how it would easier to move a saw across an 8'x16" piece of plywood than it would be to move that piece of plywood, sideways, across a tablesaw shows that you never done either.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 7/18/2016 9:23 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

is easy with a simple sled. I had a RAS and got rid of it, and have never regretted doing it.
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On 7/19/16 1:55 AM, Just Wondering wrote:

I have a sled, too, and it doesn't support the other 6 feet of plywood hanging off the side of the saw, when cutting near the end of an 8ft board. My RAS is built into the workbench that run lengthwise in the shop and easily supports 10 or 12 feet in both directions of whatever I'm crosscutting.
--

-MIKE-

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On Tue, 19 Jul 2016 10:58:29 -0500, -MIKE- wrote:

My sled has a couple of grooves for clamps - problem solved.
--
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