Question - Raised Panels on Table Saw

I just finished making some raised panels on my table saw and was wondering what kind of blades (number of teeth, brand) those in the group have used to do this. I tried first with my 80 tooth Freud and got alot of smoking, I then changed to the 40 tooth freud and it was better but left alot of marks. Sanding took them out but boy howdy that wasn't very fun.
Thanks
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Opus -
I haven't done raised panels w/a freud 40 yet, but I have one and have been VERY happy w/it - the rip cuts are phenomenal... I did a walnut raised panel for a cradle bottom with an 80t Forrest WWII combo blade on an old sears contractor saw. While it left some marks, it wasn't bad.
What kinda wood were you woikin'? Cherry and Maple can give more trouble than, oh, MDF...
John Moorhead
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Burning will happen with a dull blade or moving the wood too slowly.
Making two passes, with the last taking off 1/8", helps for a smoother cut. You can make a jig using 1/8" thick material that clamps to the fence. That way you don't move the fence.
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I use both a 60 tooth Freud and a 40 tooth WWII without any trouble. Raise the blade in very small increments for each pass ie 6 or 7 passes to reach the final depth of cut and then make 3 or 4 passes at the final depth. This last step will remove a lot of the teeth marks and make it easier sanding.
Rick

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About 40 teeth, but make it a good one.
This is a really difficult cut. You're making a deep rip (and then a deep crosscut, and presumably using the same blade for both) and you're expecting a perfect surface finish straight off the sawblade.
Tooth shape matters a lot. I'm using a fairly normal alternate bevel, but make sure that the outer face of the insert is flat, not tapered. This is the sort of insert that's ground for a good cut quality, not squeezing the highest rip performance out of a small saw.
I use an angled sled for this job, so I can clamp the panel down to it and have a nice broad base to slide across the table. I run with the blade vertical, so I can keep the zero clearance insert in place, but I can always tilt a few degrees extra, if I want a more shallow field.
--
Smert' spamionam

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