Question on Woodworking Motor and Farm Duty Motor.

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My Taiwan made 1-1/2HP, 110/220V motor died and I am thinking of replacing it with a Leeson's Farm Duty motor. Anyone knows if Farm Duty motor is suitable for woodworking machines? Further is Grizzle's motor any good or where could I find a good deal for woodworking's motor? Thank you.
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The load on WW motors is generally very light. You didn't say what tool is involved, but any motor should be fine, assuming it doesn't have a manufacturing fault. Wilson

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wrote:

It's a 1-1/2hp, 8" jointer. The machine is lightly used and over two years old. Yesterday, I used it continuously for about two hours and it starts making a funny noise, the motor's thermal overload tripped and quit. I opened the machine panel and smell the insulation, the motor was warm, not hot. After it cooled down, it started with the funny noise again and quit, this time my 20 amps panel's breaker tripped.
I am thinking of replacing it with a 2hp Farm duty motor which is cheaper than a Leeson's continuous cycle motor, or buy a Grizzle's 1-1/2hp motor. I really don't think the motor is kaput, maybe the motor's insulation is bad or the power wire is a 8 ft,16/3 gauge. Maybe, if I replace it with a 12/3 it may help? Any suggest or should I go ahead and replace the 1-1/2hp motor with a Farm duty 2hp motor.
Thanks again.
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snipped-for-privacy@somewhere.org (Jack) writes:
[...]

For such a tool the kind of motor to get is a 3-phase asynchronous motor.
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869

in homes. Businesses are very different. Jim
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Then a phase converter to run it on.
Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869

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A phase or rotary converter will cost a few hundreds more. BTW, do you think by changing the original 16/3 about 8 ft long connecting power wire to a 12/3 will help? I got a gut feeling the under size power wire drawing excessive current and tripped the circuit breaker in the control panel?

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It sure isn't gonna hurt. 16ga is kinda light for that motor.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Jack wrote:

An undersized wire will have too much resistance, thereby drawing LESS current, not more. Because of the higher resistance, more power is dissipated in the wire; therefore it heats up, eventually getting hot enough to melt the metal (and/or start a fire) resulting in an OPEN circuit, not a short circuit.
1.5 HP is a little over 1100 watts. At 220V, that's around 5 amps of current. 16/3 shouldn't have any problem handling 5 amps. If you're running it at 115V, you're closer to 10 amps, which is still okay for 16 ga. wire. Personally, I'd replace the wire with 12/3, but don't expect it to solve your issue.
Josh
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Farm duty motors are green, green is ok...stay away from blue motors. Usually farm duty motors are totally enclosed drip proof and will serve you well. Keep an eye on http://www.surpluscenter.com / they have been a good, cheap supplier for me.
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On Sun, 11 Jun 2006 13:07:23 GMT, "Tom Gardner"

Your site does have the motor I could use for the replacment. I will check with them tomorrow for the S/H after I replace the 16/3 wire to a 12/3 wire and test it again. Thanks you.
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Jack wrote:

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I don't think you could overload this motor in a jointer, unless face jointing hard wood and doing it rapidly. Your 16 ga wire was very short and probably didn't make enough drop to be a big deal. I think you have an insulation fault that caused the overheating and eventually got serious enough to short out and blow the breaker.
If it is not enclosed, you could have sawdust in the starting switch???
My jointer is a 6" Sears with about 1/2-3/4 HP and never overloads. Wilson
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wrote:

I was facing hard maple in rapid succession. In the past I had never encountered any problems. I did touch the wire and it was not even warm. I rotated the pulley and it rotates freely with no resistance whatsoever. Tomorrow, I will replace the wire and if it still trips, I will replace the motor. Any idea if the motor still salvageable? BTW, the jointer is a Yorkcraft.
Thanks everyone. I really appreciate it.

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wrote:

switch can be replaced. Bearings can be replaced. There really isn't much that can't be fixed. Jim
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wrote in message

The question is, what can be done for less than the cost of another motor. When I had to replace a 1 3/4 HP motor a while back, I called a place looking for rebuilt units. They told me they don't even bother rebuilding anything less than 10HP. Start capacitors and thermal switches might be easily replaceable, but I wonder about getting a smallish motor rewound.
todd
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wrote in message

the OP and the rebuilder. In all likelihood, though, it would be cheaper to replace a motor with a bad field.
Jim
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Somebody asked:
>Any idea if the motor still salvageable?
Yes, but at what price.
I have been out of the motor business for over 25 years.
Back then anything below 10HP was automatically scrapped because you could replace it for less than the rebuild price.
Would not surprise me if the cut off is 15HP these days.
Lew
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eliminates the electrical drag (resistance) caused by undersized and overheated wires. Damn minimalistic engineers.
Pete
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Whichever motor you decide to use, make sure it is TEFC rated. (totally enclosed, fan cooled). The 'totally enclosed' part ensures that sawdust won't find its way into the innards of the more. 'Fan cooled' is self-explanatory.
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