question for turners

I have a lathe that I use to make chair legs. This is almost always green wood, and everything I turn is round. I made a diningroom table, and had a devil of a time making the transition from square to round. What tool and technique is the best for doing this? I know, I should buy a book on turning, but I figured i'd ask here first...maybe even get a quick recommendation on a book that might show me that. Thanks
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Not to be rude, but: rec.crafts.woodturning is a pretty busy NG.
Alex
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Thanks. Didn't know it existed...this and antique radios is the only two I read. I'll check it out. Off to learn more about wooden bowls and cowboy hats than I'll ever want to know...
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mark wrote:

The best tool for use on a lathe to go from square to round is a roughing gouge. If the entire leg is to be round you can knock the corners off, making a octagon, using your tablesaw which will speed the process.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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a
Frank Pain _The Practical Woodturner_ , though out-of-print, may be available in the library or a used book store. Any turning book should show it. Frank Pain _The Practical Woodturner_ , though out-of-print, may be available in the library or a used book store. http://www.alanlacer.com/table_legs.html Is one location on the web.
At any rate, process is fairly simple. Use a fine-tooth saw to cut the corners at the transition points. You can even take a chisel and back cut a bit to them for relief. After that, it's skew, point down or chisel, referencing initially on the transition cuts. You can also use a gouge if you've relieved for a start.
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The best way to do such transitions is as follows:
Sharpen your skew.
Position your toolrest AT the centerline (height-wise).
With the spindle turning at medium speed, place the skew on the toolrest long point down and with the shaft parallel to the ground. The width of the shaft should be nearly vertical; i.e. the short point is at the top and the long point at the bottom. You may need to tilt the skew towards the wood SLIGHTLY so that the cutting edge is aligned with the wood's motion.
Align the bevel of the skew with the contour you want to cut and present the edge to the wood. Keep the shaft parallel to the ground as you make the cut. This cut is a highly angled slicing cut made with the long point, and minimizes splintering.
Note that the technique is similar to v-grooves and facing end grain, except that the skew is kept parallel to the ground rather than being levered in.
As you approach the final cut, increase RPMs, take lighter cuts, and move slower.
To sand, use a long sanding block, holding both ends and presenting the middle to the cut edge.
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perfect, thanks. I'll give it a try.
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