Question about Teflon tape for air compressors

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On 19 Nov 2005 07:13:17 -0800, wood snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It isn't - it works fine. You can even use it on oxygen systems.
You might need (or be required by local bylaws) to use the high density PTFE tape for sealing flammable gas systems in your locality (yellow spools in the UK) rather than the "water grade". The cost is only trivially more so many people only use the "gas grade" for everything.
Remember too that PTFE thread sealer tape is only useful on tapered threads, not parallel threads (there needs to be some compression) and it's certainly not useful on metal compression joints, metal face joints or around metal olives. If you're using parallel threaded pipe, use a liquid sealer that sets.
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Andy Dingley said:

Hmm... metal olives - quaint term. I believe I'll have one of those in my next Martini. Shaken, not stirred...
(I know what you are referring to, just never heard them called that before - you're in the UK, no?)
Greg G.
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So what do you call them in the USA ?
And what's a "Martini" Outside of M*A*S*H and Bond I think I've seen more of these as rifles than as drinks. Does anyone really drink them?
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wrote:

Actually, I don't know. Are you talking about the flared part of a compression fitting?
Yes. People drink martini's.
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wrote:

No, those are "flares" - I think the terminology is the same. An olive is the loose ring that's used in some other types of joint. They can either be soldered in place (an old sort of flare) or they're sharp-edged and used on soft copper pipe with a compression fitting.
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LOL. I didn't know they had a name. I've always called them "the compression ring". Let me check the Web.
Ahhhh....
http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infplumb/infcomp.shtm
Compression ring is the American jargon.
Adding "olive" to the same google search, produces some UK sites.
http://www.diyfixit.co.uk/nflash/plumbing/CopperComp/CopperComp.htm
olive = compression ring
BTW...it appears that
Spanner = Pipe wrench
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wrote:

Not really. We do use "spanner" much more commonly than wrench, but rarely in plumbing. A ratchet wrench uses a "socket" but the common double-ended workshop tool is always a "spanner" (except amongst muzzleloaders with wheellocks). For the sort of adjustables used in plumbing we generally call them "waterpump pliers", "Moles", "Stillsons" (tradenames) or just "adjustables", sometimes wrenches but almost never spanners.
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On Sat, 19 Nov 2005 20:18:03 +0000, Andy Dingley

I've seen "spanners" used on bicycles, cameras, old computers, and telescopes. These have fixed "C" shaped jaws with pins along one side. The pins interlock with holes or depressions around a ring-shaped nut. Other spanners have a ring-shaped business end to wrap around a strange shaped collar.
Here's some examples: For motorcycle shocks: <
http://w6rec.com/duane/bmw/shock/spanner.JPG
Lock rings, as seen on cameras and old computers: <
http://www.micro-tools.com/Merchant2/images/sp1.jpg
Bicycle bottom bracket rings: <
http://www.revolutionbike.com/SPANNER-WRENCH.jpg
A pipe wrench would destroy the subjects! <G>
Barry
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On Sat, 19 Nov 2005 22:18:39 +0000, Ba r r y wrote:

Those are "pin spanners" and they are not always of a fixed span. I have several adjustable pin spanners that either hook into the face of a shallow ring that's been drilled to accept the pins or with a single pin meant to wrap around the outer edge of a ring that has been drilled on the edge (usually at several locations) to accept the pin.
I formerly worked as both a machinist and as a die-maker. Working to international standards (British, German, Japanese, American, French) will definitely cost you a BUNCH of money in tooling!
Bill
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On Sat, 19 Nov 2005 20:18:03 +0000, Andy Dingley wrote:

Hmmm I thought that a Stillson wrench was a smooth-faced pipe wrench.
Bill
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wrote:

A Stillson is a pipe wrench (it's intended for gripping pipes, not really flat-faced nuts) but they always have asymmetric vee grooves cut into the faces. They need a certain amount of wedging action to work, because their jaws aren't parallel. Without the teeth I doubt they'd grip at all.
http://www.tooled-up.com/artwork/ProdImage/BRIST350PB.jpg
It's generally a good guide to not trust any British domestic plumber wielding a Stillson. We don't use the large threaded connections where they'd be appropriate and they're infamous for chewing up the soft brass fittings we do have. A plumber with a Stillson probably has a horse and a stetson too.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

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Stephen Young wrote:

that would be ferrule.
Dave
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Andy Dingley said:

I was thinking of basin cock couplings - something which is not seen much anymore. Could also be used for compression ring couplings.

A cocktail made of gin or vodka and dry vermouth. <g>
Plutocrats love'em.
Greg G.
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wood snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

it on any threaded connection. On air lines, especially instrument air lines, you have to be careful not to allow any of the tape to extent over the ends of the threads. This could let lose pieces of tape come off and enter the air system. Lose pieces in the system can stop up air ports or any filters in the system. If you are concerned about this possibility you can buy liquid Teflon in a tube from HD or any hardware store.
In reality the Teflon in not a sealant. It is an anti-galling compound that keeps the male and female thread from galling together (welding together by the heat of friction) when you tighten the connection up.
Henry
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The source of the comment should be enough to ignore it. Its a bogus comment. Even the idea of removing all the factory compound and redoing all the joints is weird. Did they repaint the compressor as well?
You'll do fine with Teflon. I believe the comment from the person who is a pipefitter is as well founded advise as you could get.
Bob
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There is a thicker Yellow colored Teflon Tape that is made for gas connections. I have been using Teflon tape on compressor fittings and air hose fittings for years however the Yellow stuff is much easier to work with as it tends to not stick back on itself.
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I've been using Teflon tape on all my air line connections. No issues for 15 years. It might even be cleaner than dope--perhaps less chance of excess breaking off into the line.
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Phisherman wrote:

fitting, it's almost impossible for any teflon tape to enter the tool's air inlet.
Dave
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The problem with teflon is the failure mode. When it lets go, it sends millions of razor sharp shards of teflon in every direction at 850 miles per second. You definitely should take out all your teflon and replace it immediately. It's like having a bomb in your shop waiting to go off. Now I've never known anyone personally who was killed by exploding teflon, but I don't want to be the first. :)
DonkeyHody "We should be careful to get out of an experience only the wisdom that is in it - and stop there; lest we be like the cat that sits down on a hot stove-lid. She will never sit down on a hot stove-lid again---and that is well; but also she will never sit down on a cold one anymore." - Mark Twain
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