Question about hand planes

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On Sun, 08 Nov 2009 11:49:50 -0600, Steve Turner

Guess you're going to have to come into the house some time, gasp for air and then fall motionless to the floor.
After you've been laying there for two hours, you're free to get up and be satisfied that your point was properly demonstrated. :)
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wrote:

Hadn't thought about it. I use the red stripe Johnson wax.
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On Sun, 8 Nov 2009 01:20:08 -0800, the infamous "LDosser"

Ditto. ( Mark, have no worry about camellia oil and spontaneous combustion. It's a totally non-catalyzing oil, as safe as an oily shop rag. <shrug> Minor risks are everywhere in the shop.)
-- The Smart Person learns from his mistakes. The Wise Person learns from the mistakes of others. And then there are all the rest of us... -----------------------------------------------------
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Larry Jaques wrote:
... snip

Ah, thanks. If it doesn't polymerize, then I'm not worried about it. I'll have to check it out and see if it fits into the work flow better than the paste wax.

--

There is never a situation where having more rounds is a disadvantage

Rob Leatham
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On Sat, 07 Nov 2009 23:09:32 -0500, the infamous snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com scrawled the following:

Candle wax is a lot messier to put on. It cakes on up to 1/8" and then crumbles off. Pieces go everywhere and you won't notice them until the glue or finish starts to go on, and then it's too late.
I prefer not to find problems like that if I can easily avoid them.
Paste wax and TopCote products go on in molecule-thick applications and don't crumble, flake, or otherwise come off on the wood.
-- The Smart Person learns from his mistakes. The Wise Person learns from the mistakes of others. And then there are all the rest of us... -----------------------------------------------------
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On 11/8/2009 9:04 AM Larry Jaques spake thus:

Bullshit. Just plain bullshit.
I've been using candle wax to lubricate cutting tools (planes, saws, my tablesaw table, etc.) for *years*.
No *way* is it ever going to cake up to 1/8". Not even 1/64".
When you swipe a piece of wax across the sole of a plane, you're depositing a schmear of wax that's *maybe* 0.003-4" thick. Once you take the first stroke across the workpiece, the wax is distributed across the sole of the plane in a microscopic film.
*Most* (not all, but most) of the wax stays on the sole of the plane. Whatever miniscule amount transfers to the wood is of no consequence to later glue-up or finishing operations.
This is just so much ado about nothing.
I guess if you only buy $900 planes, then you ought to buy camellia oil or whatever. Otherwise, use candle wax (or beeswax, or whatever else is handy.)
One thing I would definitely *not* use is silicone, which can mess up finishes badly (fisheye, etc.).
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Sometimes I've seen a fringe of wax on the leading edge of the workpiece, indicating that much of the surplus was has been sraped away.
The lubrication is still effective all the same.
Jeff
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Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
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On Sat, 07 Nov 2009 21:55:11 -0600, the infamous Steve Turner

I clean and Johnson Wax my planes at least once a year (when I remember) for rust control, but that doesn't seem to transfer.
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I clean and wax my Johnson every year too. On my table saw and tools though, I've gotten better results with Boeshield.
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wrote:

Is there a trick to applying Boeshield? Stock doesn't seem to slide as freely on my saw with it. I use it, but am not entirely happy with it.
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krw wrote:

You have to buff it off, just like wax. After all, what you're really doing when "waxing" a top, is filling all the micro-pores in the metal.
You want something really slick, try Super Lube Dri-Film. Someone in here mentioned it a while back and I tried it. Spray and ignore, nothing else to do.
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I just spray it, le tit set a few minutes and wipe down with a paper towel. Not as slippery as wax, but seems to last much longer.
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wrote:

I thought I did that. The first time I put it on evidently it went on too thin because there was rust showing up on the top. The directions said to leave it on longer before buffing down, for more protection.

Does it protect the surface? My saw is in the garage, in Alabama. It gets rather humid out there.
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krw wrote:

It's doesn't purport to, like Boesheild, but it seems to.
I'm in TN, and like you, the tools are in the garage. When I first got the Dri-Film, I had just picked up an older 14" bandsaw with cast iron table. The table still had the goo they put on at the factory to keep in from rusting during transport and storage. I used spirits to remove the goo and when it all evaporated, I immediately sprayed on the Dri-Film. That was several months ago and there's not a spec of rust on it.
In any case, it's worth the money to pick up a can. It's by far the best "can't tell it's there" lubricant I've ever used.... and I've tried dozens.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Whether it needs it or not.
Thank you, Ed and I will be here all week.
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wrote in message

Hell Ed, theres coffee all over my screen and through my keyboard now ; )
diggerop
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On Sun, 8 Nov 2009 17:10:28 -0500, the infamous "Ed Pawlowski"

It's the buffing with the 7" bonnet that gets me.

I don't want to mortgage the house. That crap's 'spensive. Besides, I bought one can of Johnson's Paste Wax and ended up with 4. That's a lifetime's worth, ah reckon.
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wrote:

I've never seen the need to use any form of lubricant on my hand planes. I occasionally (once or twice a year) polish the soles by hand with steel wool. Works for me.
diggerop
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Clean & sharp, along with thin cuts, gets the job done.
Lew
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On Sat, 07 Nov 2009 22:03:31 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

I don't use any wax on tools. Hand planes may not ride smoothly if the surface is not absolutely clean. For cleaning I use mineral spirits. You could use acetone, but don't allow it to touch plastic or handle finishes. For storing any length of time, I wipe all iron parts with a rag very slightly dampened with kerosene (or WD40) to prevent rust.
I do wax my tablesaw top (Johnson's Paste wax), but the surface is thoroughly buffed out with a dry clean terry cloth.
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