Question About Dovetail Jigs

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Try it with some hot glue to tack the front to the drawer. Works a treat.
Clamp a straight edge below and mark your references on the scrap for centering. Pan head machine screws work well.
In real life aligning the face and attaching is difficult

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I may try that on the next job. I have often thought of using hot melt glue but always thought that the glue would create a gap between the drawer box and the decorative front.

The reason that I use pocket hole "Style" screws is to insure that the screw threads are no longer in contact with the 1/2" front of the drawer box. The smooth shank on the head end of the screw will let the drawer box snug up tight against the decorative drawer front. If the threads are in contact with the drawer box there is normally a gap between the two and I end up having to unscrew and replace the screw several times.
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I bore the holes in advance, and of course, they're larger than the threads. That way I can also do them on the DP where they're square to the surface.
Glue's on the edge, where it peels. Though I suppose doublestick would work between, I've not used it.

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Sorry for sounding dense, but I'm having trouble visualising where you would use those screws. Do you mean just the screws or actual pocket holes? In either case, where do they go?
Gerry
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wrote:

No pocket holes, just pocket hole STYLE screws. They are self tapping, have a large washer head and are 1-1/8" long. The screws go through the front of the drawer box "from the inside" to the outside and screw into the Decorative drawer front. If the screws were longer, they would come through the front surface of the decorative drawer front. Think of how drawer knobs and pulls are mounted and the direction that the screws point.
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http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/bt_door.html#drawer_lock_bits_anchor
Shows it in use with a rabbeted front, though, as Leon mentions, the easy way is to apply the front to the box which is the drawer.
I use this one for my shaper, but it's the same bit, really. Got it for $20 when the Green Bay Woodcraft sold out.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
They're self-squaring, provide good glue surface, and mechanical resistance in the direction of strain. Only thing nicer which is cheap and easy for a guy with a router table is a box joint with an applied front.

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philly45, before you buy any DT jig, I think you're going to want to invest in a couple of good books on kitchen cabinets. That will help you understand and decide how you want to approach your goal.
The ones I have and like are "Building Traditional Kitchen Cabinets", by Jim Tolpin, and "Building Kitchen Cabinets" by Udo Schmidt. wReckers have given great reviews to publications by John Paquay (sp?), a sometimes contributor here, and Danny Proulx (sp?). Good threads on kitchen cabinets are in the Google archives. I remember that Swingman has contributed excellent advice on the topic, but then, my memory isn't what it once was on certain details.
The point is, before you start buying tools, you, and any other 'interested parties' will want to make a few decisions on what the results should look like. Then, you MAY end up with fewer boxes of 'it seemed like such a good idea at the time' investments. No guarantees.
And you may end up having the doors and drawers made commercially, when you think it all the way through. Or not. But you will be better prepared to make that decision.
Enjoy the ride!
Patriarch
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some good questions. Go to www.woodshopdemos.com - use internal google to get your answers
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It takes about an hour every day, and in one or two weeks you'll be a pro at handcut dovetails. Spend your money on a good set of chisels, a skew chisel, a bevel gauge, and a couple mallets. After some practice, you can bang out a drawer by hand with the same time spent setting up a jig & router. True, it will take less time with a jog if you have a lot of drawers to complete. I've produced several beautiful dovetail joints by hand.
On Tue, 06 Jul 2004 14:26:30 GMT, "philly45"

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Truly an art that keeps escaping me. I have watched the Frank Klaus video 50 times and he makes it look so easy. It almost looks like he's using Mahogony because it seems so soft. My using oak seemed tantamont to striking a rock with a hammer - and the resulting cuts showed it. I've always respected those that can do that by hand. Kudos.
Don
wrote:

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Here's a nice one: http://www.lie-nielsen.com/tool.html?id=DS&cart 421032829539
:)
Brian.

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