Question about decks and Kreg Jig kit...

Page 1 of 2  
I've just been looking at the Kreg Deck jig being advertised on Lee Valley's website. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?pe628&catQ&ap=1
I was wondering about fastening deck boards as demonstrated by this jig. For those of you experienced with building decks, would the screws need to be inserted on both sides of a deck board, (assuming there's just enough room for screws to be inserted on a 45 degree angle both edges) or just on one edge? And if it is just one edge for fastening down a deck board, wouldn't there be a tendency for the opposite unfastened edge to rise or perhaps cup over time?
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Usually one edge but then there would need to be an equivalent of tongue-in-groove hardware to hold down the other side of the plank.
I prefer my deck boards screwed down, when using real wood. Warping, splitting and cracking will give you a mess and it probably costs more than the decking lumber.
---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Looking at a nice Kreg display at David Eisan's store a couple of days ago, my hunch is that they don't sell jigs. They sell screws. The good ol' 'sell-through' concept. Sorta kinda like Gillette selling blades, not razors. Or the old days of Xerox. They didn't sell copiers, they sold toners, chemicals and paper. Regardless, I like that Kreg bunch. Great solutions, quality tools and a savvy management team. Good on them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

...I like Kreg products, but I don't know 'bout this method/tool. It doesn't seem, by the very nature of installation of deck boards, that there would be room to fit the jig on the other side. I'd be a bit leary, in any case, that the screw head (and countersink hole that it resides in) would be facing up to catch moisture. Absolute best system of invisible fastening is a stainless bracket installed on the joisting lengthwise, that allows the installer to screw up into the deck board from below. Slick.
cg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Disclaimer: Just an opinion
This looks like a solution in search of a problem driven by the need to grow the business. Looks like a miss rather than a hit, such as their first great idea of bringing pocket holes to the masses. Lots of great products are followed up by derivitves that don't deliver near the same value.
Problems? 1. Yes, I would also assume a one sided attachment is not a good thing. The first basic but glaring deal breaker flaw.
2. If you read the text, first drill a pilot hole, then place the jig, then use the special screws and special driver so screw can be driven through drill bushing. Plus plastic deck spacers. Lots of special things to keep track of, lots of steps for somewhat less than optimal result.
3. Yeah, side placed hole is hidden but no better than top down hole in terms of water intrusion.
4. Competing against top down screwing and 100 different bottom and side attach brackets.
"Maybe" they can make enough from the hobbiest market but seems like a real market miss in terms of a good distribution channel. It needs to be in home depot not Woodcraft and not so many folks buy $100 specialized tools for the one deck job they do per 20 years in home depot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Kreg Deck Jig is used to secure both sides of the board. The Jig appears to have a built in spacer for spacing the decking 1/4" from the adjacent board.And the jig is available at Lowes. Not sure how well it will work as i have no experience building decks.But if I ever give it a shot will give a review .
On 06/03/2010 11:43 AM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

re: "a built in spacer for spacing the decking 1/4" from the adjacent board."
If I had put 1/4" spacing between the boards when I built my deck, combat boots, nevermind high heels, would fit through the gaps once the boards dried out.
I left *no* gap and the boards shrunk just enough for a small gap to open up so water runs through but heels don't.
Actually, I have one pair of stilettos that give me trouble...whoops...wrong group. Nevermind.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/3/2010 2:18 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

LOL..
Time honored gap hereabouts for the last 100 years ... the width of the shank of a 16d nail.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

That's what I did when I built my deck and after the PT decking dried out, I have too big a gap for my tastes. If I had it to do over, I would have butted the PT boards and let the gap for drainage develop on it's own as the wood dried out. For this reason I would not go for the Kreg system, not to mention a 100 bucks is too much for this tool, particularly if you are not in the deck business. I have no complaints about the standard screw from the top, but the EB-TY system looks good if I wanted to eliminate visible fasteners.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u8hOBhKYyzk

--
Jack

Artificial Intelligence is no match for Natural Stupidity!
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/3/10 2:18 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Yeah, I never understood that. I guess I can see it for composite, but not treated. Pressure treated lumber has something like 30% moisture content. Those things shrink at least 1/4". Even Cedar is going shrink some.
I use a pry bar to squeeze treated decking boards together as tight as I can, so when they shrink, there's a small gap... as you described. I see so many decks with 1/2"+ gaps in the decking. I immediately think, "yep, they used a spacer to set a gap."
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think that depends on how wet your wood is when you install it. I've seen decks that were installed like that and they still have no space between the boards so now water just pools up and you get green mildew all over it in a hurry. Unless it was dead sopping I'd use some sort of spacer.
JP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Most PT wood has not shrunk, yet, when you buy it, no matter what the moisture, content. It typically takes a full year to shrink back but it works very well in our climate. As well most decent lumber yards keep the PT outside in the rain, covered up in a steam bath.
Water moisture may not be the only factor in wood shrinkage.
---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/3/10 5:26 PM, Josepi wrote:

I would contend that it's the only factor, along with whatever carrier they use to inject the insecticide into the wood, *if* it is something other than water.
I would be eager to corrected if wrong, but it's my understanding that H2O in liquid or vapor form is the only thing that causes the initial shrinking of lumber and its consequent seasonal expansion and contraction.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/3/10 5:07 PM, Jay Pique wrote:

I've seen dried out green wood at the home stores, but I would never by it because it's always twisted. It probably varies with region, but around here, the green stuff weighs 2-3 times that of dry lumber. That's all moisture... 70-80% of which will dry out.
I've seen that there are newer techniques for treating lumber that don't involve pumping it full of liquid. I think that's better for all of us.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-MIKE- wrote:

A major local lumber yard in my area actually has resorted to watering their pressure treated lumber to prevent it from drying out and twisting on their dime. When it's cut water sprays off the saw blade.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/4/2010 8:00 AM, Nova wrote:

Been cutting a lot of PT wood in the shop the last few months and you're right, some is so wet that you have to have a towel handy when cutting it.
Often the past year or so an entire pallet of HD tubafours is dripping wet 'peel cores' from the plywood mills ... this stuff does not readily accept the treatment and warps like crazy after it dries to around 30% ... an entirely useless product, sold at a premium price to those who don't care, or know the difference.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote: ...

There are a couple of the low-price farm stores here carrying line fence posts from them... :(
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
following:

That's the main reason I don't do that style of line fence. I haven't seen any good stock in town anywhere and half the new line fences of the peeler style are warped as hell, up to 3" off true in any given green peeler.
I suggested that another client get her own "cherrytone" landscaping peelers because I would have to charge her for the winnowing process at an hourly rate. Her husband has a pickup and they bought the first batch, so the suggestion wasn't as far out of line as it may have sounded.
There is far too much crap wood being sold everywhere nowadays. I asked the guys at both local lumberyards why they didn't have a slightly better grade of PT lumber. He said that people wouldn't pay for it. I told him that my clients and I had discussed it and all would be happy to pay up to 50% extra to get lumber which was sound, which wouldn't warp as it dried, and was properly dried after treatment. They suggested my telling it to the owners, who are seldome around. Oh well...
-- It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. -- Charles Darwin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Larry Jaques" wrote:

SFWIW.
When I built my glass measuring table to build the boat, built a frame of doubled 2x6's with two layers of 1/2 CDX for the top.
The legs are also 2x6's.
All the 2x6 were green Doug Fir and took about a month in the California sun to dry out.
Since this table would be set on bare dirt, needed to preserve the bottom foot with some kind of sheep dip.
Chose a copper based green goop from the H/D.
Got 4 empty plastic antifreeze jugs, cut off the tops and put each leg in it's own bottle.
Poured the green goop into each jug and repeated this process each day for about 10 days.
Let it rest another 2 weeks, then gave everything two coats of primer and a couple of finish coats of floor & porch enamel.
A week later, placed table in service, outdoor, on bare dirt.
18 years later, the legs were in great shape; however, the CDX needed some help, even though it was covered with a silver tarp when out of service.
YMMV
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

of growth before SYP starts producing strong stable wood, that's why they get so crazy warped up.
So yeah, they're junk.
basilisk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.