Question about cabinets

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"RemodGuy" wrote in message

You're absolutely right ... my head math was off. IIRC, the rule-of-thumb formula I picked up at some point along the way for the estimating the weight of granite was .097 of the cubic inches. I don't know if that is standard or not, but it seems to get you in the ball park.
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Granite 168 LB's per cubic foot
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Mike G.
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"Mike G" wrote in message

That coincides nicely with the formula in my previous post for estimating granite countertop weights: (cubic inches X .097) = 167.6 Lbs cf. Weight does vary according to type. IIRC, the black granite, which is popular these days, is denser and runs in excess of 180 lbs cf.
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RemodGuy wrote:

This is dependent on where you are and the prevailing prices of materials and labor. Areas where labor is inexpensive will use thinner material (2cm/3/4") and pay to have someone laminate a drop edge on. Where labor is higher it pays to buy thicker material (3cm/1 1/4") and not have to hassle with the laminated edge.
Once upon a time laminated edges were done all the time. Now the tendency is to see 3cm/1 1/4" a lot. Personally I like the look of the 3cm but it makes for a different cabinet detail, i.e., you have to jump through some hoops a little, to hide/bury the plywood sub-top.
UA100
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RemodGuy wrote:

I'm glad you axed that question. The last bits 'n pieces I got were directed through Carrera, Italy (1). In fact I "had" to go there for final selections of the material before it was fabricated. The things I have to do for my employer? Sheesh!
(1) The stone comes from all around the globe and shipped to Carrera in blocks where it is sawed into slabs, cut to size and fabricated. Carrera is also where Michelangelo apprenticed in the quarries (cavas) and eventually where he (Michelangelo) took the marble to carve the statue of David. Just say (tmPL), being/standing in/on/around the same spot as Michelangelo once/mighta stood can/will/should give you the goosie bumps. Then again, maybe it was just me.
UA100, who will say, if you get a chance to visit Italy, jump on it...
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Hi Jim,
This is very coincidental since we just had granite installed over our 16 year old oak cabinets. Before they came to template, I reinforced & leveled evrything in our kitchen (about 70 sq ft of granite). I screwed 2x4 to the back walls & put 3/4 sheets of plywood next to every cabinet I could access.
More to the point of your question, the joint around the dishwaher probably "failed" because of vibration. Typically, they tap in some brass sinkers after hammer- drilling a hole into the granite, then screw in the diswasher flange. I can see that if this were anchored in both sides of a joint, that the vibration would cause the epoxy to fail after time.
Our joint did not occur in this location, but when I questioned our installer about it, he suggested that if we did opt to put the joint in that location, it would be a good idea to span the distance (cabinet to cabinet) with wood & then anchor the dishwasher to the wood and not the granite.
Just a few thoughts for you.
Lou
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Lou,
Thanks, and very coincidental.
The joint in question is actually just to the right (facing the wall) of the right-side of where the dishwasher was. It's kind of strange, because there is absolutely now support for the granite over the dishwasher... it's just cantilevered.
The arrangement is (again, facing the wall, and not to-scale):
joint | V ================= ============= <-- Granite |-----| | ---------| sink --- dishwasher - corner - etc.
Looking at he above, the countertop on the left is slightly higher than the part on the right.
I actually thought that the left part had "risen", but the granite guy was 100% sure that wasn't the case, and that instead, it was the part on the right that had lowered (he checked with a bubble-type level).
Like I said, it was kind of funny (in the sense of strange) because he was really curious about this, being a geological engineer. He was kind of guessing that it might've been caused by some undetected earthquake. I was kind of joking with him that he was probably sensitized to this because he was from Turkey :). We're in Virginia, so I don't know if this is even remotely possible, though I recall there was a small one either here or in Maryland a few years back.
Anyway, we'll talk to the carpenter about the screws. I guess I'd feel better myself if they put new ones in new locations.
Thanks, Jim
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