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Watching Norm and others make drawers, they always slide the bottom panel in from the back and hold it in with brads. My preferred way is to rabbit all four sides and totally enclose the bottom panel.
Why do the slide in? It would seem that enclosing all four sides would make a much stronger drawer, especially as support for the bottom goes.
Deb
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I have made drawers both ways and I found that I had an easier time assembling the unit if I made the square first and slid the bottom in. Also, from the perspective of replacing the bottom- for whatever reason- it is easier if you slide it in.
Marc
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Sometimes things get spilled in a drawer that never dries or have a bad odor. Or the bottom gets broken. Doing it norms way enables you to replace the bottom easily.
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O.K., I guess I don't understand. If you rabbit all four sides, you still slide it in and attach the back? Don't you? If you need to replace the bottom you still have to take off the back in both cases. Don't you?
Thanks for all clarifications.
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wrote:

No. The back can be narrower in depth than the front [false or not] by the amount necessary to slide the bottom in and out. The bottom is supported by the rabbet on the front and sides. That is sufficient for normal abuse. So, the bottom can slide under the back portion for insertion or extraction. It can then be tacked to that back portion if the fit is near as dammit is to swearing.
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No. Rabbit the two sides and front. Raise the blade up (assuming table saw here) and run the back through so it literally cuts all the way through right where the rabbit is on the other pieces. Assemble the pieces, slide the bottom in and attach the back of the bottom to the underside of the drawer back. Make sense? Probably not. Perhaps someone else can come through and explain it better. Cheers, cc
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Whoops! Replace Rabbit with "Dado".....where's that cup of coffee?
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James "Cubby" Culbertson wrote...

Ok, these are nits to be picking, but technically (and since you seem to be well-humored :-)...
(1) It's "rabbet," not "rabbit."
(2) Dadoing is cutting a groove across the grain. Cutting a groove with the grain is ploughing. OTOH, I suppose the distinction could be considered archaic if the work is done with power tools.
Jim
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Jim Wilson wrote:

What does Norm use? "dado" (you seem to be well-humored, too)
Dave
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David wrote...

Of course! (G)
Jim
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Jim Wilson wrote:

but then again, he always uses a few brads "to hold it together until the glue dries"... <g>
dave
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As long as we are being pedantic (and I love to be pedantic).....
In that case the verb would be "plough", but the object of that verb (the noun) would be "groove".
Right?
This is confusing because "dado", at least in the modern WW vernacular, is both a noun and verb.
-Steve
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C & S wrote:

So is "plane", "saw", "drill", etc.. :-).
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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"Ivan Vegvary" wrote in message

Nope ... the drawer back, while flush with the drawer sides at the top, only extends down to the top of the groove that holds the drawer bottom. (IOW, there is no groove in the drawer back).
This allows you to slide the drawer bottom in from the back, then use fasteners to attach the drawer bottom to the bottom edge of the drawer back.
... a classic drawer construction technique that has stood the test of time for at least a couple of reasons:
By sliding the drawer bottom snug to the groove in the drawer front, then fastening it to the underside of the drawer back with mechanical fasteners (no glue, or spot gluing to allow for side to side expansion in a solid wood bottom), you have made the drawer assembly a bit more resistant to racking by effectively uniting the drawer back and drawer front into a more solid unit, and in a direction that is not normally prone to wood expansion to any detrimental degree.
And anyone who has ever had to rebuild/restore/replace an entire drawer just because the bottom failed/cracked is much more likely to appreciate the method and consider it for future drawers.
--
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Swingman wrote:

As long as the bottom isn't glued in, I don't see the problem in changing a bottom even if it is captured. You just rip the back on your table saw at the top of the bottom (top of the dado) and pull that thin strip out (which makes the drawer a standard non-captured bottom). Except you have a saw cut in each side at the back, which no one will ever see. And if you want to do extra and work you won't even have that cut.
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"George E. Cawthon" wrote in message

just
That "no one will ever see" was another reason for circumventing that possibility and making the drawer bottom easy to replace in the first place.
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I know that I missed a" one heck of a "whing ding" I hope to one day participate in your world famous get together. This year we had way too much going on. But maybe next year with a little more warning.
Leon

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Ivan Vegvary wrote:

No you don't. The back is not grooved, it stops at the top of the side grooves. The bottom overlaps the bottom of the back and is attached with one or two screws, depending on drawer width.
To remove the bottom, just undo the screws and slide it out.
P.S. Note I changed "rabbet" to "groove". A rabbet is along the edge of a piece. A groove (with the grain) or a dado (across the grain) is within a piece.
--
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I use a slightly different method. I do what Norm does, just slide it in on three sides, but the drawer back I trim the height equivalent to distance between the drawer bottom and top of the drawer. Then after sliding the drawer bottom in, I screw up from under the drawer bottom into the drawer back.
This gives the stronger construction aspect that you're talking about while also permitting the option at any time of removing the screws and sliding the drawer bottom out.
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"Dr. Deb" wrote in message

in
make
The ability to easily replace a part that is often the most abused, without destroying the unit, is a prudent design consideration.
IME, the "slide in" method makes for a stronger drawer as there is arguably more resistance to racking forces, due to the mechanical fastening of the drawer bottom to the back, than you get with a "floating" drawer bottom captured in a groove.
--
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