Quality Dog Door

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Tue, Jan 25, 2005, 1:03pm (EST-1) snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (NehmoSergheyev) irrationally mumbled: Most burglars around are black, and they're afraid of dogs. <snip>
ROTFLMAO Sure, in an all black neighborhood. And, afraid of dogs? That would pretty much depend on the individual, and the dog, wouldn't it? You really ought to think a bit before you say things like that.
That's the reason I keep coming back here, every once in awhile some real entertainment pops up.
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Sorry, it doesn't meet all your requirements, but I have had this one for about 4 years, lab flies throught in and out and it is never failed.
http://gundoghousedoor.com/gun_dog_house_door.htm
built by a guy who runs a kennel as I remember, because he had your same problem.
Good luck, Mike C.
Nehmo Sergheyev wrote:

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Dumb question, but I'm curious..
What happens with these doors when the dog goes out halfway and then decided to back up? Wouldn't a solid panel door snag and injure the dog?

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- Noozer -

decided
- Nehmo A valid issue. There are lots of accidents with *humans* using regular side-hinged doors. The possibility of an accident with a dog using a top-hinged door shouldn't be discounted. Just like people, dogs get old and frail. Every dog isn't robust and young, and the one-way crawl-through design may not be appropriate for an almost-crippled fifteen-year-old.
Most of the commercial doors have a one-way (work only for dog movement in one direction) top-hinge design. To make the doors two-way, the doors have another door within a larger door. In one example, the aluminum frame hinges in one direction, and the inside-the-frame Plexiglas flap hinges in the opposite direction.
Most of these commercially available doors also don't accommodate the entire dog body they are crawl-through, having the threshold a few inches above floor level.
If the door threshold were closer to floor level and if the door opening were high enough to accommodate the height of the dog, say, up the height of the dog's back, the backing-out snagging [1] could be minimized.
Nonetheless, even with improvements, the top-hinge door-within-a-door doesn't seem like the best. I'm considering a double door (two doors hinged on the sides that meet in the center) with the pivots of the hinges on the tops and bottoms.
And I prefer tempered glass to Plexiglas if a transparent section is incorporated. Plexiglas scratches too easily.
[1] I imagine, most dogs, once snagged form trying to back out, would realize going forward would solve the problem.
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The first thing that comes to mind is the Gary Larson "Far Side" cartoon that is on the November 2005 calendar that has popped up all over my office...
"Here Fifi..."
:-)
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