"proper" way to deal with warped edging for plywood?


I ripped down a purpleheart 1x4 to use for edging on maple ply. The board was beautifully straight to begin with.
The last cut started closing on the back of the blade, which made things "interesting". (Anyone have a design for a splitter to fit an old Rockwell 9"? There's no room on the insert behind the blade.)
After a couple of days, the pieces I had ripped off bowed and twisted somewhat--the worst was maybe a quarter inch out when holding one end flat.
Is this basically to be expected? Any ways to minimize/avoid it?
Chris
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Chris Friesen wrote:

Yes. Well sometimes anyway. The more important the job -- the more likely.

Don't cut wood. :-)
Just cut the edging immediately before use -- then glue ASAP -- best practice is to glue freshly worked wood anyway -- the glue bonds are better.
If the wood is twisting and warping etc then cut oversize, glue up the piece, then after the glue sets smooth with a nice satisfying spot of planing. It will make you feel good and look nice.
It works for me anyway...
http://woodwork.pmccl.com/Business/productsbusiness/productsfurniture.html
See edging on the oak desk and the walnut trim on the tray...

-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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