Pro's And Cons of Hollow Grinding

I am setting up a sharpening station, and I enjoy getting advice about different methods.
Could some people explain why they prefer either hollow grinding before honing, or relying entirely on flat abrasives.
Thank you in advance.
Dwight
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've heard hollow grinding on lathe tools allows the chip relief you need for proper cutting, and also allows you to quickly tune up an edge, since it's like putting a micro bevel on a plane -- you have a lot less metal to remove at the cutting edge to make it sharp. I hollow grind my skews, but don't really notice much difference in operation between a perfectly flat edge and a hollow ground edge. Get a little belly on it tho, and watchout... you'll mess some stuff up that way. Not sure why, since I'm not an expert turner by any means.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

thing as "chip relief" to worry about.
Skews with "bellies" are called gouges. Some are called "skewchigouges."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, I meant on a skew, where your normal edge looks like \/ and instead, you sharpen it to have a slight roundedness because you did it by hand, and couldn't keep it totally flat, or you did it on a slack belt or a buffing wheel.. It seems like if it's that way, it either skates or digs in when you don't want it to.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Hollow grinding allows you to hone the tip and heel only, reaching an edge much faster than removing metal from the entire bevel.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 00:49:00 GMT, Ba r r y

The downside is that you go through irons more quickly that way.
-- Save the Endangered ROAD NARROWS! -|- www.diversify.com Ban SUVs today! -|- Full Service Websites
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 08:48:07 -0800, Larry Jaques

How?
The edge is only hollow ground when it's damaged, such as after being dropped, or about every 15 or so honings.
My experience is that I'm not hollow grinding any more often than I would have hit the 220 grit stone, so it's not a big deal. An acquaintance of mine who uses his chisels to make a living has had the same ones since 1982. <G>
You guys who say that are really splitting hairs.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hollow grinding tends to create less friction when cutting.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Try both and decide for yourself. I never hollow grind. Waste of metal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Were you hollow grinding every time? If so, that is a waste of metal.
Unless I drop it, I can normally sharpen a chisel 15-20 times before I have to regrind.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dwight wrote:

I don't have a problem with hollow grinding per se, but I hate my bench grinder for so many, many reasons. It's just not a good way to sharpen anything, even with fancy high dollar wheels on it.
Flat grinding is slow and tedious, but it delivers excellent results. I think if I were going to step up to a powered system, I'd go with something like the Veritas power sharpener deal and keep flat grinding. Wheels just seem like such a PITA overall, even if I had a slow grinder and a good tool rest.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 23:49:56 -0500, Silvan

I think they both have their place. For shaping and reshaping the initial bevel, a wheel seems best. A large grit and slow speed wheel can make quick work of an otherwise (somewhat) time consuming task.
After the inital hollow grind though, I gotta figure that an efficient workstation with a good set of well-maintained stones is the best and quickest way to go.
I envision a full set of Shapton Stones all in a row, covered by a tilt- up glass dust exclosure, just waiting for a spritz of water and a skilled hand to put the appropriate edge to the appropriate tool....
Someday.
JP ************** In search of a rabbi.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I agree with you there. I do my hollow grinding with a stationary belt sander with a 6" wheel.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
:I am setting up a sharpening station, and I enjoy getting advice about : different methods. : : Could some people explain why they prefer either hollow grinding before : honing, or relying entirely on flat abrasives.
Try my web site - Sharpening Notes - Hollow Grinding, Good or Bad. : : Thank you in advance.
You're welcome (in advance).
Jeff G
--
Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
Email: username is amgron
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.