Preventing Salt Air Corrosion

A friend is planning to build a woodworking shop on Cape Cod. Are there any woodworkers from that area who can tell us what to do to protect his tools from salt air corrosion? If so, what do you recommend? What has worked for you?
Thanks, Joel
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On 4/29/2014 3:06 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Yep, move further inland. That will protect his tools. Other than that, you will be faced with rust no matter what. Cape Code puts the salt water in the air.. No getting around that, any protection does not last more than a few days, its just so caustic.
--
Jeff

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On 4/29/2014 3:06 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

A well built structure with "tight" doors & windows will do pretty well.
A garage shop with big ass metal garage doors and lots of air space will give him a fit keeping the rust down.
I have the second option and live on a salt water creek and about 3 miles by air to the Atlantic Ocean. You buy WD-40 by the gallon and do your little clean up about once a month. The salt air and humidity is a baby doll to deal with.
A case of this will help a LOT:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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On 4/29/2014 2:06 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

3 Things to consider. Obsequiously salt is in the humid air. We have the same problem in the Houston area. The trick is to coat the top with something like TopKote, as directed, and keep the top dry. I have little issue with rust as long as the top stays dry. Drip sweat and all bets are off, that is salty too.
Regardless of where you are if the air is humid and you expose the iron to quick temperature changes that causes condensation on the surface you will have a battle keeping rust off. Don't air condition the shop to cool and then open the windows to let the warm humid air in.
As a side note, I have discovered by accident several years ago that the quickest way to remove rust/patina from a cast iron surface is to simply put a drop of PVA wood glue on the spot. Leave there for a few seconds and wipe away. The result for me has always be a fresh silver colored surface.
I have not yet had the gahones to try that on the whole surface. I discovered this while doing a few glue ups on top of the saw.
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At least until your new saw warranty expires. :)
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Net nanny tip of the day...it is "cojones" :)
--

dadiOH
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On 4/30/2014 5:54 AM, dadiOH wrote:

That is right! I was thinking go-nads.
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I could live with gojones or maybe even cohones :)
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wrote:

Does that mean that you live without them? ;-)
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No, I still have them. Not as functional at 80+ as they were in earlier years but they are still there :)
--

dadiOH
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