pre-hung exterior door

a minor challenge but i took my time installing a pre-hung door but now i have two small pieces left that i am unsure about
the 1" x 2" square and 1/8" to 1/4" thick and tapered and they are made from the same material that the door seals are made of
i am going to look at the door again tomorrow and maybe it will jump out
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Shims? I would think shims would be a little longer, though. *Maybe they're "economy" shims.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/5/15 12:33 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

Probably corner seals. Bottom left and right between the jam and door sides. Supposed to help keep out water at those two trouble spots.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, June 5, 2015 at 9:13:03 AM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:

I'm no contractor and it's been a long time since I installed a door & frame. I don't foresee installing one any time soon.
I had never heard of these corner seals. Good to know! Thanks.
I Googled them and watched the first two YouTube videos, only... no further reading. I'm still not sure how to install them. Will study more, later.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 05 Jun 2015 09:13:01 -0500

this makes sense i think you are right
i will have to dry fit and see if i agree with the implementation because i cannot see how they would help out much
this door also has an adjustable sill which i have never seen
i fiddled with it but it makes no sense when it would be used because it raises only the part of the sill that the door seals to
if there's a gap at the bottom then there's a gap at top and seems to me that the entire door and frame needs to be adjusted but maybe i am missing the point of the adjustable sill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, June 5, 2015 at 3:26:29 PM UTC-4, Electric Comet wrote:

Once again, I have to ask:
Did your read the installation instructions? This is from Step 8 of the The rmaTru instruction document found at:
http://www.thermatru.com/pdfs/installation/InstallationInstruction.pdf
"Your door unit may have an adjustable threshold cap. When properly adjuste d, it should be snug and slightly difficult to pull a dollar bill out from under the door when it is fully closed. The dollar bill should be able to b e removed without tearing.
This check should be performed at each adjustment screw location. After adj usting the threshold cap, ensure that the weatherstrip is flush with the to p of the threshold cap. Trim as necessary."

The top of the door is sealed by the weather stripping on the jamb. The doo r closes against it, just like on the sides. A slight gap between the top o f the door and the part of the jamb that faces downward is not an issue bec ause the face of the door is sealed against the jamb's weather stripping.
You can't have that same weather stripping on the bottom because users woul d trip over it. The adjustable sill raises the sill up to the bottom of the door to seal it, since you can't seal the face against the jamb.
If installed properly, it should only take a slight adjustment, not enough to become a tripping hazard.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 5 Jun 2015 13:00:12 -0700 (PDT)

this adds up but here is what interests me considering that this is a pre-hung door why have an adjustable sill these should always fit perfectly from the factory
and to further bore the reader
i think they just include the adjustable sill because they got them in bulk and use them on all their doors i.e. all wood, metal, metal skinned, composite, etc.
but this door is metal skinned so it won't expand/contract like an all wood door

if installed properly it shouldn't need any adjustment mine needed no adjustment
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, June 6, 2015 at 2:16:25 PM UTC-4, Electric Comet wrote:

In a perfect world, yes. However, most of us don't live in a perfect world. In a perfect world, they would state the rough opening measurements, you w ould build your opening to those exact specs and the door would fit right i n, perfectly square and plumb and level with no need for shims or any adjus tments. When has that ever happened?

Really?
The buy them cheap and just put them on every door because they have them? Maybe you should check out some other doors. They don't all have adjustable sills.
From the waudenamillwork.com installation manual quoted below: "Some units have an adjustable sill." (Some, not all.)
From midwestmanufacturing.com: "If the unit has an adjustable sill..." (If)
From masonite.com: "Some door units are supplied with adjustable sills." (S ome, not all)
I will wager that the better the quality of the door, the higher the odds a re that it will have an adjustable sill. It is a useful feature, as explain ed below.

I don't know where you live, but in my world houses settle and things move. Weather conditions can make doors and windows tighter and looser. A perfec t seal today doesn't mean a perfect seal tomorrow.
Page 15 of this installation manual ( http://www.waudenamillwork.com/SiteAs sets/Documents/WM_Install_ExteriorDoor.pdf ) suggests that you adjust the s ill even after the door is hung "plumb, square, true". The adjustable sill is not simply provided as a quick fix for a poor installation.
"Some units have an adjustable sill. They have adjustment screws in the thr eshold. The screws are visible when the door is opened. After the door is h ung plumb, square, true, and completely fastened in the rough opening, open the door and check fit between threshold and bottom sweep. There should be only slight resistance between the door bottom sweep and threshold.
IMPORTANT: Too much pressure against bottom sweep will cause rapid wear. Th e goal is to achieve even pressure between the bottom sweep and threshold. Too much pressure will shorten the service life of the bottom sweep.
Check this adjustment at least twice a year or more often on doors being fr equently used."

Maybe not now, maybe not ever. You are lucky to be living in such a perfect world.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, June 5, 2015 at 1:39:14 AM UTC-4, Electric Comet wrote:

Did the time you took include reading the install instructions?
Did the instructions mention these items:
http://www.diydoorstore.com/Universal-2Pkg-Bronze-Jamb-Corner-Seal-Pad-_p_311.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If it was like most things now-a-days the "instructions" were a bunch of illustrations that might as well have been Egyptian hieroglyphics for all the useful instruction they conveyed.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, June 5, 2015 at 1:52:38 PM UTC-4, John McCoy wrote:

I guess it depends on the quality of the door you buy. The following doc is similar to the instructions that came with the ThermaTru doors that I installed a few years ago. Step 9 details the installation of their version of the Corner Seal Pads.
http://www.thermatru.com/pdfs/installation/InstallationInstruction.pdf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/5/2015 12:33 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

If the door jam is not hung properly these shims are meant to be placed between the jam and the weather strip. The shim pushes the weather strip out towards the edge of the door to close any gaps, especially if you see any sun light when the door is closed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 06 Jun 2015 09:06:01 -0500

i am sticking with the "provide additional water proofing at the base" theory because if a pre-hung door is installed wrong it needs to be intalled right
i used plastic shims and lots of sealant and carefully placed wood shims around
and i took my time because i really hate re-doing stuff like this
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/6/2015 1:16 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Well yes but the vast majority of prehung doors are NOT hung right. When you get into new home building you see these small wedges used on multiple locations. If the installer bends the jam too much or don't shim enough between the rough opening and the jam the jam can bow.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Do they have stickum on them? I think you describe the insulation seals that the door seals do not complete, and are attached where there is an air leak. John
"Electric Comet" wrote in message
a minor challenge but i took my time installing a pre-hung door but now i have two small pieces left that i am unsure about
the 1" x 2" square and 1/8" to 1/4" thick and tapered and they are made from the same material that the door seals are made of
i am going to look at the door again tomorrow and maybe it will jump out
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 6 Jun 2015 07:41:41 -0700

yes they do and i didn't notice that until i took them out of the bag

for a pre-hung door i think it's just to give additional water protection at the base as someone else said
if your pre-hung door is installed and has air leaks than the install is bad or the door is bad
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.