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I'm posting this here because I think the technology would work great on wood.
There is no massive chip build-up issue with wood and the hole size could theoretically be increased by quite a bit with the HP and thrust ratings we are capable of.
If someone had a high volume, larger hole process to perform over and over again in an automated fashion, this could be a great option.
Check out this link for a 2" hole being drilled through a 3/4" piece of steel with the 5160-x series AutoDrill.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
)oswoasnLQ
We haven't quite solved the chip build-up issue yet when drilling metals given the different diameter holes that can be drilled, etc. See the problem here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JiDKnuHuI

We think that either a stationary bar next to the tool or some type of peck cycle will help solve the issue but given the fact that we're two days into the 2" diameter process, I figure we're doing okay.
Note that the chip issue in the first video is solved by having an interrupted cut. In other words, the large 2" hole intersected with a another hole just ever so slightly so that the chip was not continuous.
Will try to answer any legitimate questions asked and of course would welcome ideas on the chip build-up issue in metal. I presume it would be even worse in plastics, etc.
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com Production Tapping: http://Production-Tapping-Equipment.com / Flagship Site: http://www.Drill-N-Tap.com VIDEOS:
http://www.youtube.com/user/AutoDrill

V8013-R
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Two suggestions for chip buildup - 1) high velocity vacuum. That is, a vacuum system with a nozzle near the cutting head that is capable of drawing the chips in at a high velocity. This gets them away from the immediate area around the cutter: A more conventional chip/dust collection system could be used downstream. 2) well, if you can't suck, blow. Blow chilled air onto the cutter. Chilled air will also help keep cutter heads cool and make them last longer, and may reduce resin build-up. If you have compressed air (and I bet you do), you can attach a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube to a compressed air line (see:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vortex_tube). Here's a company that sells them - http://nexflowair.com/vortex_tubes_and_spot_cooling.php - google for more venders.
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The Vortex coolers do a good job. So does a high velicity air blast or vacuum. However, the steel chips are simply too heavy for most of these to work well. Wood, no problem at all I'm thinking but we will run a test to see.
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Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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How about putting the depth control rod closer to the drill bit? You can see the spirals that get close to it breaking off. If not the depth control, then something else in the path of the chips to break them into smaller lengths.
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I'm a bit worried the depth ontrol unit will actually be damaged in the long run... But a hardened steel version is available and we were thinking of a sacrificial rod.
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Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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