Possible sandpaper find

A friend of mine restores old motorcycles. He long ago taught me to paint.
A friend of his brought over some Indasa Redline Rhynowet sandpaper 600 wet dry.
My friend is a die hard 3M guy. He just hates to deal with inferior finishing materials.
He's said it far surpassed 3m. It cut easily, without clogging, and lasted.
He's going to try the 2500 for buffing out the final coat. I'll let you know what I hear.
Has anyone used this? Seems like an option for someone needing a super gloss finish, possibly on a veneered project.
--
Jeff

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On 3/14/2016 8:59 PM, woodchucker wrote:

I have never heard of it but there seems to be a new breed of sand papers showing up these days, especially those that do not clog. As I have mentioned before the Granat made by Festool lasts and lasts and lasts....but only goes to 1500 grit in certain sizes.
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On Tuesday, March 15, 2016 at 9:19:12 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Leon - is that Granat paper stearated? I found this,
http://www.festoolusa.com/media/pdf/abrasives_brochure.pdf
(I had NO idea that Festool was so far into specialty abrasives) and even o n FOG, I can't find out any info about its chemical treatment or bonding.
But looking at that chart, it doesn't show the Granat as a recommended prod uct for wood sanding. If it works, it works, but when I do a kitchen I use a lot of paper when I am refinishing the cabinets. I am ALWAYS ready for a better solution.
Finding the Festool papers on Amazon, they aren't much more than my favorit e Mirka gold papers. The difference of proce over a few jobs, nothing. I K NOW the Mirkas are stearated, but I really prefer papers that aren't, espec ially when sanding non wood surfaces.
Any thoughts?
Robert
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On 3/16/2016 12:25 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Does this help at all?
Granat is our most long-lasting and highest performing abrasive and is well suited for nearly all applications, including bare wood, paints, most modern paint systems, VOC clear coats, plastic materials, solid surface materials, acrylics, and composites. Hardened Aluminum Oxide, Synthetic Resin, Closed Coated.
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On Wednesday, March 16, 2016 at 8:38:42 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Probably.

Most likely some kind of non clogging agent. When they are "coated" it is usually a stearate of some kind.
If you don't push them too hard, stearated papers work just fine on bare wo od, and even wood with light coats of thin finish like the factory lacquer coat on factory made cabinets.
Not good on varnish, paint, heavy coats of anything else.
Some of the heavily coated papers you can actually see the stearates and th e coatings mix together and stick in small clumps on sandpaper when using a powered sander. Most people don't realize that the hard dots of resinous material that either stick to sandpaper or has to be picked off one at a ti me is usually at least in part coating from the paper.
Robert
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On 3/16/2016 11:44 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I guess my next question is what do you want the paper to do on painted surfaces, prep for the next coat or remove the finish.
I Originally bought some Crystal "Festool" paper to remove the paint from a BBQ. I found that it worked to remove a finish from something I was working on and did not clog. Fast Forward to the last year or so and I gave the Granat a try. I found that it performed better than the Crystal. I put a piece of 120 grit Granat on my Rotex sander and did all of the preliminary sanding of the joints and glue ooz out and the paper did not clog. I actually sanded the whole project, the TV entertainment center that I built in November with "that piece" including removing the stained and varnished top, I was not happy with the results of the stain. With that same piece of paper I sanded the night stands that I built in February. So it holds up very well from removing glue residue and quite well removing the stain and Old Masters varnish once it had dried.
It did clog on a neighbors "Mexico built" end table where the finish, probably dissolved tar, never really cured.

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On 03/16/2016 12:25 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Only specific paper I see mentioned by Festool as stearated is the Vlies with SiCarbide but some of the others mention "special coating" or other similar words.
I'd send 'em an inquiry if concerned regarding possibility of fisheye in prospective finish (which is, I presume the reason for the query).
I've not used any of their abrasives; I've used almost all Mirka since the barn rework as we sanded it entirely to try to make paint stick after 50+ yr of weather and after going through all the common alternative suppliers the Gold did perform better than virtually anything else.
I've still a lot of Klingspoor product for belts...they build best there is there imo but I've discovered that unfortunately their adhesive doesn't have a long shelf life (which they've agreed with but have no solution nor recourse). If you're not going to use 'em inside six months, I'd recommend buying only what you'll use for them altho know that's outside the subject just thought I'd throw it in...
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On Wednesday, March 16, 2016 at 9:19:32 AM UTC-5, dpb wrote:

That and the fact that the hardened dots of coating on paper mixed with bit s of paint/wood resin/clear coat leaves a less than acceptable finish. The low melting point of the stearates can also mix with the wood dust in some instances and do the same thing, which is an addition to the already probl ematic stearates left behind which indeed can cause fisheyes in your finish . And resands. And refinishes.

Like I said in an earlier post, they are my top choice. Although for heavy industrial grinding, I like some of the new Bosch papers in the 60 and 80 grit.

I agree completely with those comments. I was sold a Klingspor years ago a s at that time Woodcraft championed them as the perfect paper. All the cab inet guys around here changed to Klingspor and I still see the Klingspor tr uck from the distributor around here from time to time.
But when I was buying their product I was doing a LOT of finishing/refinish ing, so I was buying 250 disks at a time. I bought from a discounter and h e had "deals" on Mirka, Klingspor, 3M and another Canadian made paper. Whe n though with a job, the sander, paper and N95 masks go into a tote out in the hot shop until further use. The Klingspor actually had grit flaking of f on the papers that were about a year old (seen two summers in the tote) a nd the others were fine.
I settled on Mirka as it didn't load, got good life out of it, and cut clea nly. Also, my sanders like the size of fuzz they put on their papers. And of course, delivered to door as needed in two days on Amazon Prime.
Robert
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On 3/16/2016 11:59 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

OK, if that is what you are wanting to avoid, the little specks of finish or glue that stick onto the sand paper, the Granat does not get loaded with those dots whether sanding cured varnish or dried glue. The paper appears to remain as clean as it was straight out of the box.
I very likely sanded for an hour, glue joints and a 2 day old stained and varnished finish, with a single piece of 120 grit. The paper only looked a little tattered around the edges.
The low melting point of the stearates can also

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On Mon, 14 Mar 2016 21:59:46 -0400

the thing i have not tried yet is the mesh sandpaper but i hear that it is hard to clog and lasts long
they have very fine grit at least up to 2400
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I gave used it and it does cut quickly however my experience is that it is fragile. It tears/damages very easily.
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