Poor Results with Mohawk Toner

(see accompanying post on alt.binaries.pictures.radio)
For a long time, I've wanted to try Mohawk toning lacquers for refinishing antique radios. I finally plunked down some cash to order a few cans of it, along with some stain markers and fill sticks, and my first try did not yield very good results. I tried applying the toner (Tone Finish, pigment-based) to bare, sanded wood in multiple coats. As for photo shows, it applied very unevenly indeed. I'm new to using this stuff and I'm wondering what I did wrong. Is there something else I'm supposed to apply underneath it, or would I be better off using a dye-based (such as Ultra Classic) toner instead? I chose a pigment-based toner because I didn't want it completely transparent. Thanks for any advice.
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Chris F. wrote:

I don't subscribe to the binary group you posted the picture to, but I've got an idea what your results look like. <G>
Toners are usually applied AFTER dye stains and pigment stains, including their associated spit or barrier coats. If the part isn't stained at all, there will be at least a coat of clear finish or sandign sealer before the toner goes on.
I'd apply a clear coat or three before trying to spray toner. Try it on properly prepared scrap, or the bottom or inside of your project and report back.
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I tried putting several coats of clear sealer on the bare wood, and the toning lacquer did apply properly this time. However, when I attempted to put another coat of clear finish overtop (an hour later) it dissolved the colored coat underneat resulting in an ugly "melted" appearance. Was I supposed to let the toning lacquer dry longer, or is there another coat that's supposed to go between? I've obviously got a lot to learn yet.

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On Fri, 27 Apr 2007 23:09:24 GMT, "Chris F."

If you're using all lacquer based products, try lighter coats. They dry fast, so you can apply several a day. Lacquer coats are supposed to "burn-in" to each other. If it's totally melting, you're probably going too fast and too heavy.
If you're using varnishes or polyurethane, they're not compatible with lacquer, so stop using them with the toner.
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For some reason my accompanying post on the binary group did not go through, I have since posted it and you can now check it out.

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