PM2000 Consideration

I am seriously considering purchasing a shiny new PM2000. I am going to get the PM w/ the 3hp motor and w/ 50" fence (1792000K). My current saw (http://www.garagewoodworks.com/shop_workhorse.htm ) houses my router table on the right side (http://www.garagewoodworks.com/router_page.htm ).
My question: Is it worth the extra $200 bucks for the rout-r-lift model? I was thinking about keeping my current saw and continue to use it as a router table and work bench.
Will I regret not springing for the extra $200?
Thanks
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www.garagewoodworks.com



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I used to have my router mounted on the side table of my Craftsman TS and took advantage of the Unifence for positioning, dust collection, etc. Having upgraded I was reluctanct to add a router to the new side table and made a dedicated router table with a new lift. I am glad I did because I can alternate between both tools easily and my set up time for either one is minimal. You already have your "router table" (Does it have a lift?) and if you are content with its operation I'd leave it and use that extra money for some other toy or enhancement (or lumber). Also, it does sound like you are keeping the contractor saw so it could be used in conjuction with the PM when you are in a situation where you might be changing from dado to saw blade and back again several times. Just my two cents, Marc
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opportunity to avoid blade changes and keep a good router table.
RonB
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Please allow me to alter my opinion slightly. I can see now that you don't have a true router lift and I would certainly add one to your existing setup but keep the PM strictly as a table saw without the router lift accessory. Marc (again- now having looked at all the pictures you posted and assuming that the extra $200 you referred to are for a PM included router lift for the new saw table)
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IMO, a lift is one of the best accessories for a router. I'd not be without one now.
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I bought the router lift with my Jet Cabinet saw. For me, it was the right decision at the time. I was in the middle of putting an addition on my house (including both shop an kitchen) and I really did not have time to "build" rather than buy, and my current router table was crap.
It performs well and I like it. That said, I suspect that some of the modern routers (Triton etc.) which are designed with bottom side micro-adjustable plunge, make router lifts irrelevant.
So, I would say that it not only depends on your satistaction with your current table, but also on what router you own. Would that $200 be better spent on a dedicated router built specifically for undermount use?
2 cents and worth every penny.
-Steve

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make life much easier. That said however, I see you have the "has been around a very long time" style PC router. Basically designed long before router lifts were commonly available. Today routers come with the lift function and are literally designed to hang under a router table. For $200 you can get a router lift and you can basically dedicate that router to the router table or you can also consider buying a new router with the lift capability built in for virtually the same price as a typical lift, and then you have an extra router. Like clamps, you almost cannot have too many routers.
Another train of thought, I typically use the right wing extension on my TS to a lot of assembly and glue ups. For me a router in that location would be in the way. True you can drop the bit down and have it out of the way but that is a step that is unnecessary if you have a dedicated router table or station. Additionally with a dedicated router station away from the TS you have less chance of debris falling down into he router when not in use. I am not trying to sway you in either direction but only point out alternative ways to set your router/routers up.
You are going to love the new saw. It is great to be able to make common repeatable setups with out special measuring devices to insure accuracy. My son gave me a Wixey digital angle gauge for Christmas so that I can accurately dial in bevels between 90 and 45 degrees. I checked my 90 and 45 stop settings on my 8 year old Jet Cabinet saw and found the stops to still be dead on, I have made no adjustments to those setting since I bought the saw. The power this saw will have over the old one will give you the confidence to tackle or cut any wood with great results. If you do not use a premium quality blade, now is the time to get one and don't get a thin kerf blade. You do not want the blade to be the weakest link in you new set up.
Good luck with your decisions and enjoy!
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Router lifts are great especially if router is difficult to get to.. Your open table system seems manageable though.. Might want to hold off and spend that money on a new saw blade and/or dado set..
If it were me, I'd sell the contractor's saw to help pay for the new one and free up the space its taking up. Your new saw has a much bigger footprint and at least in my shop area, space is at a premium. First though, I'd build a simple legs & frame to set your current router table top on. You can build the frame a little deeper and add a piece of MDF in the back to extend your table top for sliding fence back further,if needed. Then glue a base to your fence with some support glue blocks with a couple holes for T-bolts, then route out a slot on each side of the table the size of the T-bolts (3/8") and an additional shallow 3/4" wide slot on bottom side along same line for T part of T-bolt to rest in. Then you can just slip a T-bolt up through the slot into the holes on your fence base with some knobs and you're good to go.. Oh a shelf or two under the router table top for support and accessories, definitely..
You're going to love that new saw..!

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it's great! You'll especially like the size of the tables.
I also agree with many other posters here about keeping the router station separate from the table saw. I'd invest the $200 in some good blades; a quality dado set or a router lift for a separate router station.
Cheers
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