plans for acoustic computer enclosure?

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The sled on my table saw won't support the weight of a dorm refrigerator. :)
Best, Christopher
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Perhaps there's other options. I'm not too far removed from your 10 terabytes with a total of more than 7 TB, but 6 TB (4x1.5 TB drives) are located in a USB connected satellite case, which is extremely small and quiet. And with that I plan on increasing transfer speed soon by replacing the USB connection with a Firewire 800 connection, which the satellite case has.
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Find an old Printer enclosure. It is a lid opening box and it has thick foam on the inside area. The issue you will come in with is air. Cooling a working computer in an box isn't easy. Not silent.
Perhaps in stead of asking for what you did - you might tell us why or for what reason.
Might be just a different computer to solve the problem. Might be exotic water cooled...
Martin
Christopher Glaeser wrote:

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wrote:

Most desktop computers cool by turbulent circulation of air, which generates high-frequency 'ssss' sound, in addition to a few low- frequency components from disk rotation and fan bearings.
Soundproofing, like in a studio, relies on baffling and putting high density barriers in low density mediums (lead sheet will stop a LOT of sound from air, less of conducted sound in wood). So, one approach is to use heavy panels (like, liquid nails assemblies of two or three thicknesses of sheetrock/drywall/gypsum board) and supporting the computer inside the box with soft foam pads. There has to be an air inlet and outlet, so either use a labyrinth box-with-baffles as an air channel, or close the thing comletely and put an air/water heat exchanger (ask at an auto radiator shop, they can build up a small core easily enough) and remove heat through water circulation.
Sound-deadening carpentry includes sand-filled panels (Wharfedale speakers, I think, used this) and humble MDF-glue construction (also a favorite of speaker designers).
Best, though, is to remove the disks and power-hungry parts to another room. Sound studios can keep laptops in the quiet room, and used 'em to remote-control the real mix computers elsewhere... rubber-chicklet keyboards and trackpads can be quieter than standard keyboard/mouse.
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The computer I'm using was $8,200. I can see I'm pushing a string here. Thank you everyone for all the computer suggestions; I know the intent was in the right place.
Best, Christopher
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RE: Subject
Check out SoundDown.
Link below.
Lew
http://tinyurl.com/yd694n8
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IF the machine doesn't need 3d accelerated graphics or full motion video, then a thin client might be a possibility--there are several ways to set that up--a netbook or a mini-itx system does fine as a thin client and they can be made as quiet as a lamp, while you can put the main machine in another room.
If you haven't checked out http://www.silentpcreview.com you might want to. Search that site with keyword "wood" and you'll find some discussion of wooden cases and some articles by people who have tried them.
If your objective is to do a woodworking project by all means have at it, but if the objective is to have a quiet machine in a reasonable time then I think that buying one is going to be a better plan.
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I have not read all of the posts in this thread. But, if one's objective is to have a quiet machine, then building one with a graphics cards having ambient cooling is a good start. Giga-byte makes some. I think their URL is giga-byte.com I like mine. If you want a quiet machine, you will probably need to build it yourself. The specifications of most components will list their sound level in db.
As may have been pointed out, "water cooling" may offer the quietest system--but I'm not willing to bother with that yet.
Bill
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Bill wrote:

Reviewing the entire thread it's clear that the OP doesn't want a quiet machine, he wants a cabinet to hold a noisy one.
Googling "DIY computer isolation box" will yield a good deal of useful material.
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Thanks, this car keeps veering off the road, and I appreciate your efforts to regain control of the steering wheel. It was probably a mistake to mention the word "computer". In hind sight I should have said "acoustic enclosure for noisy doohicky" and avoided all the discussions about replacing videos cards etc.

I had not tried that particular Google phrase and that did turn up some new ideas. Thanks again.
Best, Christopher
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Whichever way you go, you may want to consider using an indoor/outdoor thermometer to keep an eye on actual in-the-box temps.
Best of luck, and happy building!
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Agreed. Probably the best place to monitor the temp is the air flow into the computer case.
Best, Christopher
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Christopher Glaeser wrote:

Really? Wouldn't that measure the coolest reading?
I would think you would want to measure somewhere that gives the highest reading, because you want to know how hot it is inside the box.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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I would tend to agree.
I don't know which of the components represents the Lowest Common Denominator (by having the lowest upper operating range) in this equation, but ... I'd think you'd want to locate a temp probe as near to /that/ component as you could.
OTOH, if they're all within a fairly narrow operating temperature band, then ... I'd pick a component and locate it as near to that component as I could.
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Neil Brooks wrote:

www.aerocool.us has a bunch of different temperature monitors combined with other functions--some of them will support four separate temperature sensors and adjust fan speeds accordingly--they're designed to go in a computer case but there's no reason they can't work externally as part of a separate cabinet, and can be used to carry other functions outside the cabinet.
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On Fri, 2 Oct 2009 16:00:47 -0400, "J. Clarke"
Agreed. I just bought myself an NZXT fan controller and temperature gauge which does the same thing. http://www.nzxt.com/products/sentry_lx
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Yes, but I'm not sure what the reading at the computer case exhaust will tell me. The exhaust is pretty warm now just sitting in a room. If the input of the computer case has unrestricted air flow at a good operating temp, isn't that sufficient? Of couser, that "unrestricted air flow" is criticially important. If the temp at the input to the case was low but the air flow into the case is restricted, that would be very bad indeed.
Best, Christopher
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Christopher Glaeser wrote:

I guess the purpose isn't airflow, it's temperature drop, right? Computer don't need airflow, they need lower temps. It just so happens that airflow will lower the temp.
I'd say the probe (whatever) should be in the box, up high. I would move it around the box to find the hottest spot and leave it there.
You could always find a website or specs from a company that make those boxes for studios and try to ascertain where they put theirs.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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-MIKE- wrote:

I would recommend getting some software that will monitor the CPU temps. There is some free stuff out there that will do it. Depending upon how quiet you get it, check out for fan monitors as well, want to make sure they keep spinning.
Monitor it while the computer is outside the box, under heave usage. When it goes inside the final box, make sure it doesn't get much, if any, warmer.
--
Froz...

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The computer case fan speed is controlled by the computer, so the temps should be avialble to an app.

Will do.
Best, Christopher
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