plans for acoustic computer enclosure?

Page 1 of 6  
Anyone have plans or photos of an acoustic enclosure for a desktop computer?
Best, Christopher
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 1 Oct 2009 09:51:42 -0700, "Christopher Glaeser"

What is an acoustic enclosure for a computer? Never heard of one before.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Acoustic enclosures are used to reduce computer noise. One of my desktop computers has six hard drives and six fans. Kell Systems is one company that sells enclosures in this market. See http://www.kellsystems.com /
Features typically include noise reduction, air flow to extract heat, cable paths for power and peripherals, and doors for easy access.
Best, Christopher
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For a second I thought he meant an acoustic computer. (grin)
If you are recording with a microphone on the computer, you find out just how loud the things are.
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 1 Oct 2009 10:31:23 -0700, "Christopher Glaeser"

Ok, that sounds reasonable. In retrospect, I have heard of an acoustic enclosure before, just for printers, not computers. Noise from older computer systems of mine was something I used to just accept, having multiple SCSI drives and the fans to keep them cool. Then I upgraded a little while ago with fewer drives, forgoing SCSI for SATA drives and when I bought fans for it, I choose the ones with a smaller noise rating.
The only problem I have now is that I bought an i7-650 extreme processor and a Cooler Master V10 cpu cooler to go with it. The cpu cooler is damned near the size of a football and I'm dreading trying to fit it in the case I've got even though it is a monster tower case.
And no, I'm not going to try water cooling. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Every other house in Nashville has a studio in the basement, so you see all kind of crazy stuff.
A fridge in the studio is a great thing to have for keeping water and juice and snacks and whatnot.
One guy had a fridge, built into the wall. You couldn't hear this refrigerator when the compressor kicked on because it was behind the wall and he did a great job of sealing up around the fridge.
This one was the kind with the cooler on top and the freezer on the bottom. He had disabled the freezer section and used it for the acoustic computer enclosure, with a fan and access in the back, from the other room. It was brilliant and worked like a charm.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Makes me wonder about Nashville power requirements. What kind of power generation does Nashville use? Have they got their own nuclear power reactor?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

All those McMansions popping up all over the place use much more power than any home studio, just to light their shrubbery. :-)
A whole rack of effects, processors, preamps, along with the computer, guitar amps, control room speaker amps, etc., won't pull more than one or two 15amp circuits could handle.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/01/2009 11:31 AM, Christopher Glaeser wrote:

My first suggestion would be to get rid of some of the fans if possible, or at least slow them down. I cut my system noise way down by using only one case fan.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 01 Oct 2009 17:09:04 -0600, the infamous Chris Friesen

Sure, and overheat the system, causing (at worst) a fire or (at least) a component failure, like a fried CPU. Don't mess with the fans, Chris. Muffle 'em but don't remove 'em.
--
"Giving every man a vote has no more made men wise and free
than Christianity has made them good." --H. L. Mencken
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
scrawled the following:

Monitor the temperatures and you can compare the performance of various configurations.
Another "solution", and an effective one if your layout affords it, is to put the computer in a room on the other side of the wall, and to string through the cords for the monitor keyboard, mouse and speakers. You could even "caulk" the hole! : )
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I've actually been considering this for the computer in our master bedroom. The other side of the wall is a coat closet that mainly holds old junk, so it would make an ideal computer closet with the addition of a good vent fan. I may decide to re-visit that idea....
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
"I'm not exactly burned out, but I'm a little bit scorched and there's some smoke damage."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 01 Oct 2009 13:20:06 -0400, the infamous snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com scrawled the following:

Before I got this whisper-quiet ACER, I was thinking about doing that same thing for my old computer. I HATE fan noise when I'm thinking.
I was going to build two open-ended rectangular boxes about 3" different in height and 6" different in width, then line the inside with either foam carpet padding or carpet itself. I aimed to do the same thing for my compressor.
The pooter is 7w x 18d x 14h. The inside shell would be 10x20x15.5, the outer 13x23x18.5
One end and the bottom would be open on each shell.
A 4" hole near the bottom in the back of the small shell would let in all the cables and be acoustically baffled by a towel wrapped around the opening after cable routing and shell placement, open end front.
The front shell would fit around the smaller shell, providing 1.5" clearance for air intake on 3 sides, open end back. It would slide off for insertion of DVDs, or if I were playing/loading DVDS more frequently, I might make an openable door on the top of the front.
Baltic birch plywood and 3/4" cleats, glue, and "a few brads to hold it while the glue sets" make up the boxes. Once the cleats were glued and set, I'd glue the carpet down to the inside with acrylic mastic. It sets in a day and doesn't stink much while curing. Then I'd glue the panels up and brush on some Waterlox.
Set 'em outside to degas for a couple weeks and Bob's yer uncle.
These might look a lot nicer if you used steel or aluminum sheet and wetsuit foam, for that commercial look.
IAC, the foam or carpeting + angles should soak up a -whole- lot of the fan noises. Maybe Swingman could work up some drawings of these for you. (About 3 minutes with SketchUp, wot? I'm getting ready to buy a new computer so I won't be installing it on this old job.)
--
"Giving every man a vote has no more made men wise and free
than Christianity has made them good." --H. L. Mencken
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 1 Oct 2009 09:51:42 -0700, "Christopher Glaeser"

Start with a quiet tower PC case with 120mm slow-running fans. Put the computer on a carpeted floor. Replace many hard drives with a 1T HD.
The only thing I built is a wheeled base, made from some scrap pine, painted black with a front pull.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or, I could use an HP calculator; those are pretty quiet. :)
FWIW, I have 10 terrabyes of storage that includes a system drive, data drive and raid array. Squeezing into a single 1TB HD is not an option. I was thinking more of a woodworking solution.
Best, Christopher
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Christopher Glaeser wrote:

Why not just network into it, then you could move the machine far away from your desk? i.e. got a garage, closet etc. where the noise would not be an issue.
--
Froz...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's a desktop computer for video editing.
Silly me, I thought if I posted to the woodworking forum, someone would suggest a solution that would use one of those tools with a round wheel with sharp teeth, um, I think they are called table saws. My apologies for the technical jargon. Perhaps if I post this question to a computer forum they will provide plans for a 3/4" birch plywood enclosure. I'll let you guys get back to whatever it is you discuss on this forum. Certainly can't be woodworking. :)
Best, Christopher
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Christopher Glaeser wrote:

HAHAHHAHA, now you know.
Took the words right out of my mouth. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/01/2009 02:53 PM, Christopher Glaeser wrote:

Actually, from an overall perspective his post is a good one. A sound absorbing enclosure would kill the sound somewhat, but it's going to be big and bulky. Better to move the noise elsewhere to start with.
Here's what I'd do, starting with free and moving progressively more expensive.
1) Move as much noise as possible out of the room completely. This includes things like your NAS and your gigabit switch.
2) Reduce the power requirements on the computer as much as possible. Without changing the hardware this basically means move stuff from your 10TB of local disks to the NAS. Ideally you want to get rid of entire drives from your desktop machine. Reduce the number of case fans and/or run them as slowly as possible without causing too much heat buildup.
3) Enclose the tower in a sound absorbing enclosure. I'd go with a large box made of MDF or particleboard (solid wood resonates more), with sound absorbing panels on the inside and mass-loaded acoustic barrier sheets on the outside, with baffled air intake and exit. You want the air to have to travel in a zigzag pattern so that there is no direct path for sound to escape.
4) Reduce the noise on the remaining components. This starts to cost money. Use quieter/fewer fans, more efficient cpus, quieter heatsinks, quieter video cards, quieter power supplies, cases designed for cooling and sound absorption, quieter/cooler hard drives, etc. Basically go and read www.silentpcreview.com.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The local RAID is required for uncompressed HD video editing.

I was thinking along the same lines, but check out the 3D Model Tour at http://www.kellsystems.com/3d.asp#tab9
It appears the air intake is at the bottom back of the unit, and the air exhausts are a relatively simple modular package at attach to the back of the unit. Each exhaust module has three fans at an angle that force the air down and out through side ports. Is that how you imterpret this model? In other words, all of the Kell air flow is at the back from bottom to top. They make no attempt to force air to the front of the rack, so each rack unit is responsible for pulling air into the front and out the back, and then the air exchange happens at the back where the Kell vertical air flow exchanges with the rack unit exhaust. Is that the way you see it?
Best, Christopher
PS: Pause the video as necessary to examine the exhausts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.