Plans for a wooden forklift or pallet lifter/mover? (JT?)

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(Morris Dovey) whoe middle name is Scrooge says: I'm looking <snip> to avoid paying for lift gate services. <snip> Has anyone done or seen anything like this?
Not seen any plans for lifting AND moving, but several thoughts immediately spring to mind. Depending on exactly how cheap you actually are.
Brbe a few teenagers to lift, carry, load, whatever. If they're employees you can threaten firing if they don't cooperate.
Engine hoist. They've got wheels, albet rather small, and you'd be best off with a smoth surface to allow relatvely as using. Not sure if they'd lift high enough.
Make a roling hoist, use a come-along or chain hoist. Put it on weels.
Make a fork lift. Use a garden tractor, use a hand crank, or a chain hoist, to lift it. Shouldn't be a biggie.
ff you've got a peekop truck, get one ofthose bed hoists. Should run around $100. Lift whatever up, back the peekop so the load is in, viola.
Getch 'cha a big ramp, and push the load up the ramp. You coudd even make something to jack each corner up a few inches, and hook a wheel, or large casters, on each corner.
Make a large dirt ramp, make a few dozen wood rollers, get a whip, get a crew of a dozen or so Egyptians. Or, get the same, without the Egyptians, get a camera (working or no), get a dozen or so people who want to be in a movie, tell them you're making a move, charge them for acting guild fees. You get the work done, you make a profit, life is good.
That's the best I can come up with without thinking.
***********************
We can always count on JOAT for a sensible solution. In the midth of the above suggestions are a couple that are close to what I have seen done.
I have seen a hand crank fork lift that rolled around. I would think if you looked around some industrial sites, they would have something like this. Just steal the design and build you own.
The earthen ramp and loading dock is what my dad had us build on the farm. It works good if you have some cheap labor.
The wood ramp (and platform) built from some two by materials is something that I have built and used. Maybe install an electric winch on it. Bring the winch out when you are going to use it to keep it out of the weather.
PS: I have had to buy/build some lifting type things for 55 gallon drums. Some of that stuff is quite clever. You may look at some of that stuff for some ideas that could be adapted to what you are doing.
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Wed, Jun 20, 2007, 6:56pm From: leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net (Lee Michaels) We can always count on JOAT for a sensible solution. In the midth of the above suggestions are a couple that are close to what I have seen done. <snip>
Glad you like the movie idea. I think turning it into a Russ Meyer type production would be good.
Now that you mention it, when I was a kid, I don't think I ever saw a farm without at least one dirt ramp for loading trucks. A lot of the barns were either built into theside of a hil or had a dirt ramp leading to an upper floor also. Just because its low tech doesn't mean it's a bad idea.
Somewhere too I've seen plans for a homemade loader on the front of a farm tractor. Seen some made without plans too. Never heard of any of them not working.
Low tech for loading a truck tho, you can't beat a dirt ramp, some kind of a low bed mover, easy to load, then when it gets up to the truck, easy to slide the load off. Low tech, low buck, works.
There's a gass company around here wih a neat rig. It's a trailer, on two wheels. Stradles a home type prone LP gas tank, the ig one, a chain hoist hooks on and lifts it, then they fasten it to keep it steady, then drive away to wherever it's going. Clearly homemade (if not, it should be, it's definitely deasy enough to make).
JOAT If a man does his best, what else is there? - General George S. Patton
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"J T" wrote in message
Now that you mention it, when I was a kid, I don't think I ever saw a farm without at least one dirt ramp for loading trucks. A lot of the barns were either built into theside of a hil or had a dirt ramp leading to an upper floor also. Just because its low tech doesn't mean it's a bad idea. ----------------
Yep, dirt ramps were everywhere where I grew up as well. We always kept some planks around as well to augment the dirt ramp.
---------------- Somewhere too I've seen plans for a homemade loader on the front of a farm tractor. Seen some made without plans too. Never heard of any of them not working. ------------------
That would have been an easy modification to the lift bucket on the front of our tractor.
------------------ Low tech for loading a truck tho, you can't beat a dirt ramp, some kind of a low bed mover, easy to load, then when it gets up to the truck, easy to slide the load off. Low tech, low buck, works. ----------------
OK, I have to make this comment. It probably won't be implemented by Morris, but I have seen it done.
I have known three different people who have built hovercraft. One guy built his when he was 15 years old. It worked well and he ended up donating it to a school. The other two guys were backyard inventor types. But they made platforms that could lift some impressive weights. One ultimately was used in a shop setting.
They just wheeled the stock onto the platform, fired up the hovercraft engine, and the whole thing just floated a few inches above the floor. Then the material was pushed to the new location. Shut down the engine, wheeled the stock off, etc.
It was noisy but impressive. So Morris, how about it?? A dirt ramp and a hovercraft would be an elegant solution. ;)
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Lee Michaels wrote:
> > Yep, dirt ramps were everywhere where I grew up as well. We always kept > some planks around as well to augment the dirt ramp.
In my part of the country they were called "barn banks".
Very original don't ya thunk?
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

In Oz, we called 'em "Stock Ramps" and every farm with "Stock Yards had one, Quite ifyen they were built from logs but covered with soil. Regards John
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Lee Michaels wrote: | They just wheeled the stock onto the platform, fired up the | hovercraft engine, and the whole thing just floated a few inches | above the floor. Then the material was pushed to the new location. | Shut down the engine, wheeled the stock off, etc. | | It was noisy but impressive. So Morris, how about it?? A dirt | ramp and a hovercraft would be an elegant solution. ;)
Well, I kinda like the idea - but my shop is in an aircraft hanger and my driveway is a taxiway used by a dozen or so aircraft. I think the pilots would probably decide the hovercraft was cool - but the dirt ramp probably wouldn't make the grade.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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Morris, would it be possible to dig out a sunken truck ramp/dock? That way, you are not lifting the load, you are lowering the truck deck.
Bob the Tomato
On Sat, 23 Jun 2007 00:00:55 -0400, "Lee Michaels"

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Bob the Tomato wrote: > Morris, would it be possible to dig out a sunken truck ramp/dock? > That way, you are not lifting the load, you are lowering the truck > deck.
There was a time when houses were built with a set of steps down into the basement from the outside and covered with a door.
Known in my part of the world as "Cellar Steps".
Just had to be careful where you located them cuz a low spot was a bitch to keep the water out of the basement.
Lew
Lew
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RE: Subject
If you can locally (within 100 miles)get a 3,000 lb, propane operated fork lift, that is in operating condition, for under $500, case closed, unless you just need an excuse to build something.
Even if the bloody thing leaks a gallon of hydraulic fluid a week, throw down some kitty litter, and you are still ahead of the game.
Hell, a new aluminum propane tank for a fork lift is more than $100.
Lew
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Bob the Tomato wrote:
| Morris, would it be possible to dig out a sunken truck ramp/dock? | That way, you are not lifting the load, you are lowering the truck | deck.
I can see that I need to post a few photos of the /outside/ of my shop. It's in an aircraft hanger in the highest (ground) traffic area of a small town airport.
If I built a dock or ramp (either sunken or raised) I'd be lynched posthaste by the other tenants /and/ by my landlord.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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How about a simple platform, 8' x 8' (two sheets of 3/4" ply) on a 2x8 frame with 2x6 joists (24" on center) supported by 4x6 posts at truck bed level. Build up your pallet on the platform, rather than on the ground, then just shift into truck.
scott
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Scott Lurndal wrote:
| How about a simple platform, 8' x 8' (two sheets of 3/4" ply) on | a 2x8 frame with 2x6 joists (24" on center) supported by 4x6 posts | at truck bed level. Build up your pallet on the platform, rather | than on the ground, then just shift into truck.
I just love usenet! ;-)
That would work if I put the platform on wheels and added an elevator to raise the items to go on the pallet.
Kinda like a fork lift that lets one raise the pallet, then build the load. :-)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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Morris Dovey wrote:

How about a hydraulic lift table? Same idea ... plop the pallet down, build the load, wheel it to the truck, jack up the table. HF has them fairly reasonably priced. For your volume, a foot-operated table would be plenty good enough.
Cheaper than a hi-lo, probably has additional uses in your shop. (place to set Monday morning donuts & coffee for the crew ;-)
Bill
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Almost forgot. My uncle used to use a homemade wheelbarrow type thing to move his milk cans. If you've ever messed with a large, full, milk can, you'll know they're heavy. This thing was very low, with sides. It'd hold 3-4 milk cans. When you lifted the handles, the bottom only cam an inch or two offf the ground. Made it quite easy to load a full can, and easy to unload. You wouldn't want to move it too far, but fr moving cans from the barn to te milk house, about 100 feet or so, it worked just fine.
If you don't know what a milk house is, his was cement blocks, cement floor, with a large, electric powered, water filled, cooler. Lifting the milk cans in the cooler wasn't as bad as it dould be, becaus it was set down a bit. There the milk cooled until the next day when the dairy truck stopped by and picked the raw milk up. Everyhing was cleaned very well in their, daily. The milking machine and wall were cleaned with scalding water, every time used. I had an ucle in Tennessee that used a spring for his drinking water and cooling milk, butter, etc. Different places, different customs. But the one in Tennessee didn't sell milk, just produced enough for home use.
JOAT If a man does his best, what else is there? - General George S. Patton
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My grandfather did this with cream. He sold this to the "creamery". Back in the day, many small farmers sold cream to a local co-op. They even hauled it into the creamery each week. The milk that was left over was used to feed the hogs.
This was back before the high butterfat milk that we get today due to genetic manipulation of the cows and the grains, etc. fed to the modern day dairy cow.
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Morris Dovey wrote: | I'm looking for a plan or photos of a device that'll let me lift a | 250-300# pallet from the floor, can be pushed outside, and will let | me set the pallet in a semi trailer. The object is to avoid paying | for lift gate services. | | I can't find anything on Google except wooden toys and commercial | machinery. I started working on a plan last night, and it doesn't | seem like it should be all that difficult to build - surely someone | has already solved the problem... | | Has anyone done or seen anything like this?
Thanks, all, for your input. I think I'm going to try building something like the drawing posted to abpw.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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Morris Dovey wrote:

...
Morris, one other note -- occasionally you can find forklift mast assemblies at near giveaway prices. I found one for the grand sum of $25 for the trouble of them loading it on the truck. Double-mast, 10k-lb w/ hydraulics but w/o the forks. I used it to build a freight elevator to the barn loft.
If you can afford to watch and wait, such an item could be the basis for the lift and you could deal w/ the pallet mover separately.
--
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dpb wrote: > Morris, one other note -- occasionally you can find forklift mast > assemblies at near giveaway prices.
There are outfits that just part out old fork lifts.
Check with the local fork lift dealers.
They will know how to find them.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote: | dpb wrote: | > Morris, one other note -- occasionally you can find forklift mast | > assemblies at near giveaway prices. | | There are outfits that just part out old fork lifts. | | Check with the local fork lift dealers. | | They will know how to find them. | | Lew
I've found a couple of low-dollar forklifts. I figure there are a lot of the things around, and that they're all busily aging. In the short term, all I need to be able to do is hoist a 100-300 lb (maximum) shop-built pallet onto the back end of a semi trailer. The fork can will wait until I have a real need. There are other things I need to spend for first.
I'll touch base with local used equipment dealers and see if I can find a fork lift "chop shop" in the area. I won't hurt to let people know that I'm interested...
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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Morris Dovey wrote:

That's the ticket...if you know a few of the local distributors they're usually pretty good at "keeping an eye out" if they know what you're looking for and what your budget is...
Are you able to pick these pallets up w/ a sling? If so, an overhead rail w/ just a block and tackle or manual chain hoist is pretty cheap (and more importantly, perhaps, quite simple to erect as opposed to trying to cobble up a homebuilt lift or scissor table). I'd think it well worth the investment to buy an inexpensive pallet mover, though.
Although another thought just comes to mind -- what about making the pallets to have a removable axle/wheels -- a la the idea of the movable saw/planer table? All it takes is a notch to hold the fixed end and a hole for a handle and dolly on the other end--the turning end probably only needs one wheel so you have a tripod arrangement...A lever under the pallet lets you raise it to remove them when you're at the destination. Most if not all drivers have a pallet mover onboard to get stuff _to_ the tailgate so all you really need is to be able to wheel it where you can lift it up, right?
--

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