Planer question

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Lest there be any confusion over the meaning of the term "flattened", let's be specific: S2S lumber has been *planed* on two faces. It has *not* been jointed.
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wrote:

Correct, flattened, not straightened. Straightening can easily be and very accurately done on the TS with a "long sled type taper joint jig", if the wood is flat.
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If it hasn't been jointed, I wouldn't say that it's been "flattened". The straightening you describe on the TS makes an edge straight, but not a face. To make a face both straight and flat, the board needs to be jointed -- not necessarily with a jointer. Other techniques include hand-planing, machine planing with a sled, or using a router and jig. (Note that I'm not disagreeing with you -- I know you know all that already -- I'm just trying to make sure the OP understands the difference.)
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On Fri, 11 Sep 2009 09:25:35 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@teranews.com"

Forget about the jointer and run the boards through the planer only, flipping the board between passes. There are certain guidelines to follow (in terms of board shape, thickness, hardness etc) when using a surface planer but a well-tuned planer should handle rough-cut lumber with ease. Dust collection helps.
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Phisherman wrote:

I would have to agree. I just planed out a piece of walnut that was cupped. I planed a flat on one side, not fully smooth and then flipped it and took very light passes until I was planing the full board, then back over and cleaned up the first side. The result was a flat board with two smooth and flat sides.
Deb
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And this works more often than not if there is generally only one of a few issues with the board. This is pretty much impossible if the board is longer and has a bend from end to end and or a twist.
That said, I use a 8' long sled to set my rough cut wood on when sending it throught my 15" planer.
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That is the only accurate and safe way to deal with this. Not a big deal to make ether.
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Dr. Deb wrote: ...

That only works if the piece thickness is sufficient to prevent the planer feed roller pressure from deforming (flattening) the piece. Otherwise, one will end up w/ a board of uniform thickness but still cupped.
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