Panel Sled

Page 1 of 2  
So I'm finally (I know, don't kill me) building my first panel sled after 7 years of wwing. I've found different plans on the web thanks to all of you, and I've settled on a design for 2 sleds, one straight and one with a mitre. I have a few questions though if ya don't mind.
1. Does it make sense to have 2 different sleds, one for large panels and the other for smaller stuff? Idea being I'd like to have something really large for helping with sheet goods. Not insanely large mind you.
2. If I make a large panel sled, is there anything I can do to the bottom of the sled to make it slide easily on the TS?
--
[AGB] Creamy Goodness

"220, 221, whatever it takes"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Creamy Goodness wrote:

[1] Makes sense if they'll serve your needs (-:
[2] How about UHMWPE guides to fit the miter slots and some "slick tape" strips to reduce friction with the table top?
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Morris Dovey wrote:

Thought about using glides I saw at the BORG. they'll glide over anything and hold up to 1600 pounds. But they also raise the panel 1/2 inch off the TS and would slide off the edge when you push it forward (I don't have an outfeed table, just rollers)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What kind of saw do you have? I made a pretty slick sled for my grizzly contractors saw, but it isn't likely to work for any other kind since it uses the round rails to support a secondary guide/support.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim wrote:

Jet 10" Contractors saw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I almost forgot, you NEED to look at this site:
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65j/jigs.html
This guys seriously knows his stuff...
Creamy Goodness wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
shellac the whole thing to make it stable and wax the underside and runners in the miter slots. also wax your tablesaw top.
"Creamy Goodness" <creamy at agbf1942 dot com> wrote in message

7
you,
mitre.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Creamy Goodness" <creamy at agbf1942 dot com> wrote in message

7
you,
mitre.
ABSOLUTELY... One day you may want to cut compound miters. You will need a sled opposite side of the blade tilt. I use 2 all the time.

If you sled is good and flat and you guide bar is straight, it should slide easily but you can a coat of TopCote to the bottom of the sled and the top of the saw.
Can you read AutoCAD drawings? DWG format. If so I can e-mail you BASIC plans to a sled that will cut miters. I have not built the sled and feel that it has its limitations but you could probably get some good ideas from the drawing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'd like to see that one myself. I only have the one for straight panels.
--
"Cartoons don't have any deep meaning.
They're just stupid drawings that give you a cheap laugh."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Its on its way.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

mwrinken at comcast dot net
thanks Leon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

hehe, that made me laugh. I've be a CADD user since AutoCAD release 2.5, I'm an IT Manager at an architectural firm, and I used to be a CADD Manager. Not that you needed to know all of that, but yes I can read a CADD file. I LOVE desiging things in CADD and then building them.
Please email me at mwrinken at comcast dot net
If anyone wants, I just got done with a plan for mission style benches for our new kitchen table.
--

Mike



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 26 Feb 2004 10:07:40 -0700, "Creamy Goodness" <creamy at agbf1942 dot com> wrote:

Sure. I occasionally will build a new sled for a specific project, if I don't have one that's suitable. Once you make one or two, you'll see just how quickly they can go together.
I'll usually glue the runners to the panel at the end of a session, leaving them in place on the saw overnight with weights sitting on top. The next day, I can quickly screw on the front and back fences. Not including glue drying, I can knock one out in about 30 minutes of actual work.
Large architect's triangles are great for aligning the rear fence.

Shellac or wax will help it slide.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Miter sliders are the hot ticket...
http://www.woodpeck.com/uhmwtmiterslide.html
You will end up with more than two sleds...
The real big one is a good idea for large plywood panels and other stuff like that...
A smaller one is also very handy....
You will end up using sleds a LOT....and wonder what the hell you were thinking earlier....
Creamy Goodness wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 26 Feb 2004 19:24:50 GMT, Pat Barber

A less expensive source is www.leevalley.com 46J90.15 UHMW strip 3/8 x 3/4 x 24" $3.95 46J90.16 UHMW strip 3/8 x 3/4 x 48" $6.95
I ordered the 48" strip to use on a mitering sled.
In my stock was some slippery (teflon) tape which I used on the runners of my large sled now. It works and holds up well if the mounting surface is perfectly smooth.
.-. Life is short. Eat dessert first! --- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Also at Lee Valley: 25U04.01 UHMW Tape 1" x 18' $12.95
Good for putting on the bottom of the sled.
codepath
brought forth from the murky depths:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I like the idea of a couple sizes for the sleds. I built a "medium" sided one and I should really build a smaller to use most of the time. I'm not sure how useful a sled would be for sheet goods. I guess it depends on exactly what you mean by sheet goods. The extreme would be a sled big enough for a 4x8 sheet which is obviously crazy so it depends on how much of the sheet you need a sled for.
Never built a sled for mitres so can't comment.
I waxed the bottom of my sled including the tracks and it slides like snot across the saw. The saw is also waxed of course.
-- Larry C in Auburn WA "Creamy Goodness" <creamy at agbf1942 dot com> wrote in message

after 7

of you,

mitre.
and
really
bottom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry C in Auburn, WA wrote:

I'm sure this has been covered a million times in the NG, but what Wax does everyone prefer?
--

Mike



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snippage>

Yes, it has been. The answer seems still to be Johnson's, or Butcher's, or pretty much whatever your friendly, locally-owned and operated hardware purveyor has on the shelf. Look for some blend with carnuba in it. One can lasts a very long time.
Some of us even smear it on furniture now and then. Preferably over environmentally safe, food-grade, hand padded, shellac.
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I like a paste wax designed for floors, like the classic Johnson product. It can be found in many stores in the floor care product section. Look for a pure wax formulation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.