OT: Internal Combustion Breakthrough?

Page 2 of 7  
B A R R Y wrote:

From the middle to end of the bubble I would agree with the analysis that everyone was jumping in on it. The initial impetus for the whole debacle does rest upon Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the CRA. The notion of the government guaranteeing loans led to abuse on both government and private industry sides. The idea of "affordable housing for everyone" with threats by the justice department (Janet Reno era) to prosecute banks for failing to loan to these new looser standards led to the creation of the mortgage-backed securities market (my speculation is that the banks, recognizing the risk, came up with a means of spreading the risk around). Given that the government through FMae and FMac had pretty much promised to back these risky loans, that opened the floodgates for the rest of the subprime industry that sprang up around this government-guaranteed lending approach.
That, plus your assessment later that people got carried away with the notion that prices of real-estate only go up continued to feed the fire. I was disabused of that notion early in 1987 after we had bought our first house and the housing market at that time took a serious dive -- actually, that's not totally true, I knew about business cycles and expected ups and downs, just not such a big down that soon after buying. Anyone standing outside the whole frenzy could easily see that this was not going to end well and that prices were eventually going to crash, just as they always do at the end of an unsustainable business cycle. People who should have been able to afford houses were being priced out of the market, people who should never have been given loans were getting them for outrageously priced housing -- who would have thought that this was going to crash? [he asks, sarcastically].
My concern is that the very people who helped stoke this fire are now the ones in charge of fixing it -- they are blaming and threatening the banks for implementing the very standards that these congresscritters were pushing.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's only half right. Mortgage backed securities were not new with the bubble. Pretty much all loans and credit are sold as bonds or credit derivatives. The lender, say the bank in this case, doesn't want to or cannot by law hold the entire risk. Those loans are bundled and sold to investors. What should really irk you is that the investors are almost all professionals and institutions, not Joe Blow homeowner throwing darts at his investment board, and understood the risks of those investments. The normal presumption, especially in credit markets, is that returns are tied very closely to risk. Low risk, low yield; higher risk, higher yield. Investors demand the higher yield, a higher return on investment, for assuming the risk. Buying out the investors' risk and exposure with the bailout amounted to rewarding them with the high returns without the risk.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
MikeWhy wrote:

Don't disagree with that at all. Bottom line is that with the bailout, this just passed donation to DNC patrons (can't come close to really calling it a stimulus), TARP II, TARP III, TARP reloaded, etc. we are rewarding failure and penalizing success. This is going to have consequences and they are not going to be good.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andrew Barss wrote:

Which free market is that?
--
Jack
Using FREE News Server: http://Motzarella.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

I interpreted that to mean that he thought he was going to come close to the theoretical ideal efficiency, not that the theoretical efficiency was going to be 100 percent. Note the the person giving the interview was identified as "Jin K. Kim" and his title "Managing member". The guy who designed the thing is named Morgado. "Managing member" sounds like a bean counter from the venture capitalist, in which case he is parroting his own misunderstanding of something that he has been told.
I think you're reading far, far too much into that statement.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://peswiki.com/index.php/Directory:Massive_Yet_Tiny_ (MYT)_Engine#How_it_Works
stuff. Where did you learn about him?
I am going to spend a very pleasurable hour or two perusing this topic. Thanks for the heads up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Lee Michaels" wrote

Here's hoping his bodyguards are top notch ....
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Call me a cynic, but this sounds a little too good to be true. There seems to be very little "credible" press (is that an oxymoron?) given the claimed performance. And it seems to have been around for a good 5 years. It'll be interesting to see though.
JP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Interesting to see what the pistons are attached to..and how they're sealed. It is one thing to draw 'floating' pistons in a toroidal chamber.... Also it's one thing to produce a lot of power, but you have to attach the 'engine' to the frame somehow. As it sits there, it ain't producing nuttin'. I'm smelling...shenanigans, tomfoolery...IOW, I'm more than cynical.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Call me a cynic, but this sounds a little too good to be true. There seems to be very little "credible" press (is that an oxymoron?) given the claimed performance. And it seems to have been around for a good 5 years. It'll be interesting to see though.
I would say that more likely it is a great invention that will be bought by an oil company and we will never see it again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

Or Toyota or Honda, and you'll see it big time...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Damn, an encouraging thought. ;~) Only if they get there first.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Call me a cynic, but this sounds a little too good to be true. There seems to be very little "credible" press (is that an oxymoron?) given the claimed performance. And it seems to have been around for a good 5 years. It'll be interesting to see though.
JP
****************************************************************
Sounds very similar in theory to the Wankle, but more sophisticated. That was a huge success too wasn't it? (zoom, zoom, zoom)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Check out the Mazda RX8: http://www.mazda.ca/root.asp?lang=eng
Up to 232 hp from 1.3 L rotary. Goes like stink :)
P D Q
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PDQ wrote:

Yeah, we all know that Mazda keeps a token Wankel in the lineup. But don't be too surprised if in the current economic downturn that proves to be a luxury that they can no longer afford.
If it was such an outstanding success then _every_ Mazda would have one.
Friend of mine, an engineer, had an RX-7. Somebody stole it and he used the insurance money to buy a used Porsche. Says how much he was impressed with it.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd have to say that an engine that was introduced in the early 70's that continues to be used in every one of the RX models probably deserves to be called a success. The Corvette is a huge success but not every Chevrolet has a Corvette engine.

Do you buy the same car every time you purchase one? I have never bought the same car twice although I have been very pleased with most of them. Variety is the spice of life.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J. Clarke wrote:

Ectually, ------ Porsche is the ultimate in understated snobery.
Even used it is head and shoulders above a mere rice burner.
P D Q
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PDQ wrote:

A well to do friend of mine always drove Beamers, then one day he bought a Porsche... he HATED it. I told him it had to be better than those Beamers he always drove. He took me for a ride and no shit, the thing road worse than my first car, a 49 dodge pick up truck, except the Porsche had more road noise and a slightly rougher ride...
One day he drove it off the road and bent two rims... $700 a piece for rims...
--
Jack
Using FREE News Server: http://Motzarella.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Check out the Mazda RX8: http://www.mazda.ca/root.asp?lang=eng
Up to 232 hp from 1.3 L rotary. Goes like stink :)
P D Q
A big claimed difference between the rotary and this MTY engine is that the rotary engine has relatively low torque at lower RPM's the MTY claims very high torque.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
They are still making them...and people are driving them.
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.