OT: Help please: cutting styrofoam sheets

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My shop has a steel roll-up "garage" door that faces a blistering sun for several hrs/day. I'm determined to insulate it. The easiest way I see is to slap some styrofoam shhet insulation onto it.
I can get 4' X 8' sheets at Big-Box for a good-enouhg price, but need to trim the sheets down to ~ 44" X 22" to fit into the recesses of the door.
What's the best way to cut 1-1/2" or 2" styrofoam sheets? I don't have a "hot wire" cutting tool.
Thanks a heap, --Zz
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The best way is a hot wire, but an electric carving knife works ok. A serrated bread knife will do in a pinch. Art
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A hacksaw blade also works ok.
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Even a good hand saw works well.
A utility knife with a snap off blade works well if you keep it sharp.

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I prefer an old pull saw for cutting pink or blue foam up to 4 inches thick. Each pull will cut 2 to 4 inches of foam and leave a pretty clean edge.
This saw was too dull to cut hardwood anymore.
I keep it around to cut foam for my boy's modeling projects. For fancy cuts I use my scroll saw with a metal (small tooth) blade in it.
I use Liquid Nails Foam Glue to attach foam to stuff.
I too would recommend an awning of 90 percent shade cloth - put it on a home build roller and then you can roll it out on days you want to work and in on days you don't or when it might storm.
http://www.growerssupply.com has it at reasonable prices (no affiliation other than a customer) 20 foot wide runs about $3.50 US a linear foot - so a 20 x 20 would run you about 70 dollars, plus a roller and attachment to your building. I use it over my deck to great effect.
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A metal straight-edge and a thin-bladed knife such as a fish-filleting knife or a carving knife, with the styrofoam backed up by a piece of scrap plywood, works just fine. Watch your fingers. For a 2-inch-thick piece, I take two passes: one about half-way through to define the cut, and then another one to finish it off.
You can also cut it about half-way through as described above and then just crack it along the cut, if you don't mind a little imprecision in the dimensions. Or you could make another pass along the edge to square it and finish it to dimension with a bandsaw, if you don't mind a little dust flying.
I'd get "blue-board" if I were you, rather than that white styrofoam. Better insulation, cleaner to cut and trim.
Tom
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This is what I do, with an Olfa-type retractable-blade utility knife (aka box cutter of 9/11 fame) with the blade mostly all out. Either snap the board after the first cut or go through 2-3 times.
My brother uses the fancy Italian sliding table panel saw in his millwork shop. :-(

Like Tom says, the blue (or pink) extruded polystyrene, not the white bead-board.
Luigi
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On Sat, 3 Jul 2010 16:40:50 -0700, "Tom Dacon"

I wonder how well Toy's FesteringBeast would do on this stuff...
-- The most powerful factors in the world are clear ideas in the minds of energetic men of good will. -- J. Arthur Thomson
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Guys cut blue and pink extruded (as opposed to expanded) styrofoam all the time. Then they coat it with stuff to create sculpture. Cuts just fine and you can get some decent detail. http://www.talkshopbot.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11116
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wrote the following:

Guys cut blue and pink extruded (as opposed to expanded) styrofoam all the time. Then they coat it with stuff to create sculpture. Cuts just fine and you can get some decent detail. http://www.talkshopbot.com/forum/showthread.php?t 116
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Was the "Expedition" a circumnavigation? :p
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qu
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wrote the following:

qu
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The example you linked.
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On Sat, 3 Jul 2010 19:30:41 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

I wasn't talking about the CNC beast. I was referring to a certain TS-55, or was that a 75?
-- It's also helpful to realize that this very body that we have, that's sitting right here right now, with its aches and its pleasures, is exactly what we need to be fully human, fully awake, fully alive. -- Pema Chodron
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RE: Subject
Find a foam shop in your area.
They use a band saw to cut foam logs to size.
Work na deal and buy a couple of feet of the foam blade, cover the ends with tape to make handles, put on a pair of gloves and you are good to go.
You could also modify a bow saw if that makes you happy.
BTDT, forget the T-Shirt
Lew
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<respectfully snipped>

I just use the table saw, or cut it with a straight edge and utility knife with some junk wood or plywood rip underneath. With the utility knife, I make it in one pass, making sure I am all the way through as I go.
Using the table saw is much faster for me. Also, I use some canned spray foam on the edges to hold it in and fill in the spaces.
woodstuff
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I don't recommend it, but years ago I needed to rip up a bunch of 1 1/2" foam into 6"x12" blocks. I used my table saw! The foam did bind, and kick back once in a while, but when it did jamb, I just let go and let 'er fly.
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I'd probably use a junk blade for doing this. Cutting the foam might cause some melted goo to stick to your blade. (Besides, you don't need a sharp blade anyway.)
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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the following:

I did that with my olde woode gar^H^H^Hshop door and it didn't really help all that much. (2" white with foil 1 side) I cut it with a bread knife. I use a kitchen-style electric knife for cutting rubbery foam, but it doesn't work on the hard schtuff. Pink 2" is $21/sheet at HD now. <thud> http://fwd4.me/VZH
Might I suggest another tack? Drape a length of 70% shade cloth over the door or that entire side of the shop. Cost would be similar. http://fwd4.me/VZF or 90% shade http://fwd4.me/VZG in colors.
-- The most powerful factors in the world are clear ideas in the minds of energetic men of good will. -- J. Arthur Thomson
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On 7/3/2010 9:14 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Really? I did it on my garage door with two layers of 3/4" pink foam from HD (don't remember the cost) and it's helped immensely. Since 3/4" isn't all that thick I just cut the stuff with a utility knife; I'd think cutting it with any kind of saw would make a hell of a mess. I did eventually paint it white because I got a bit tired of having a PINK garage door... :-)
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