OT: Coffee Drinkers

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snipped-for-privacy@fairfax.com wrote:

Have you looked hard enough. I visited Washington DC in 1996 and I thought I saw it. Wife would not let me buy it. Crackers, pickeled ring bologna and cheese with a beer. Heaven.
Wes
BTW
There has to be a recipe on web to make it. Hold on... Going to try some pickled turkey kiebasa with this recipe.
http://www.hungrybrowser.com/phaedrus/m012302.htm#2
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< snipped-for-privacy@fairfax.com writes: <snip>

Doesn't surprise me at all, ethnic foods are very regional, but you do have Smithfield hams, and that's not too shabby when it comes to comfort food, especially in beans, any kind of beans.
Add a little corn bread, and you are dining at the pearly gates.
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Lew

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snip Lew Hodgett wrote:

I'd go along with that, 'specially if I can bust some sausage into my grits and sprinkle some chees on top... My daughter looks at me funny, but it sure tastes good. For a girl born and bred in Va she sure has some big city ways. I swear it's not my fault, it's these yuppies from god-knows-where that are all over here. I still want my pasties though. Dave in Fairfax
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Dave responds:

My mother was from Louisa County (just outside Gordonsville, VA), but I never even heard of grits until I went to military school in SC...this was pre-Parris Island. Georgia ice cream. No thanks. I prefer my corn on the cob.
But salt-cured ham is ethnic food, especially with cornbread. Just that WASP ain't considered ethnic these days.
Charlie Self
"I know how hard it is for you to put food on your family." George W. Bush, Greater Nashua,N.H., Chamber of Commerce, Jan. 27, 2000
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snip Charlie Self wrote:

Wasp IS ethic, but if you're male you're not allowed to say so. Too bad you never got a chance to get accustomed to grits. Made properly they're great, made badly they're construction goods. Parris Island shoulda made good ones though, a big part of the trick is you have to make a large amount at one time to get it to taste right, single servings just don't cut it. But I do love ham. %-) Dave in Fairfax
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snipped-for-privacy@fairfax.com wrote:

I grew up in southwestern Virginia, and I never ate a grit until a trip to South Carolina myself.
Probably why all my friends from the "real" south call me a Yankee, even though Virginia was the capital of the CSA dammit.

Got that right. If you're a white anglo dude, you're not allowed to have an opinion on anything. You might insult or downtrod someone.

And use about six or seven pounds of butter. Mmmmm....
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Silvan writes:

I've never understood why anyone would want to louse up the butter that way.
Charlie Self
"The California crunch really is the result of not enough power-generating plants and then not enough power to power the power of generating plants." George W. Bush
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"Charlie Self" writes:

way.
I'm with you, I can't handle grits or corn on the cob any more.
A few years ago, was roasting some ears of corn on the grill one night at the Port Stanley, Ontario Yacht Club, when the care taker, a local school teacher originally from Germany walked by, looked at the corn and declared, "Pig Food".
You see, humans can't digest corn, it just passes straight thru.
Had never stopped to think about it before.
Haven't wasted time eating corn since.
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On Mon, 04 Aug 2003 01:19:45 +0000, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Then, it ought'a be great for dieting - fills you up but doesn't stick :-)
I still like my (sweet) corn on the cob cooked on the barbie.
-Doug
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Mon, Aug 4, 2003, 1:19am (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (LewHodgett) says: A few years ago, was roasting some ears of corn on the grill one night at the Port Stanley, Ontario Yacht Club, when the care taker, a local school teacher originally from Germany walked by, looked at the corn and declared, "Pig Food". You see, humans can't digest corn, it just passes straight thru. Had never stopped to think about it before. Haven't wasted time eating corn since.
I'm sure humans get some nourishment from corn, after all, humans are omnivores.
Years ago, I worked for a captain in the Army. He was an E-7 when he participated in the Normandy Invasion. In fact, he said his picture was on the cover of Life Magazine, getting ready to disembark, he didn't even know it was being taken. Apparently it was taken because he was carrying enought arms and ammo for about 3 people, Thompson, pistol, flamethrower, gernades, and I don't know what all else. He later got a battlefield commission. At time he was a very scary individual to be around. LOL
Anyway, he said his squad was in Germany, while the war was still on, with starving Germans all around. Fields of corn, just at the cooking stage, but the Germans wouldn't touch it, "pig food". His squad was picking corn as fast as they could, and had found a big pot and started cooking fresh corn on the cob, and eating it about as fast as they had picked it. Apparently all they had was Cs for awhile. The locals thought they were nuts, and wouldn't touch it. Finally they grabbed some guy, and forced some corn on him. He thought they were trying to poison him. Until the taste of the first bite got thru. He said when they left, every German in sight was picking corn as fast as they could.
I got that story direct from the man himself. Somehow the military got his paperwork lost, so he was a captain for years, and never got promoted. But when he retired, they retired him as a major.
One day maybe I'll tell the story of how he missed out on maybe being a millionaire.
He scared the crap out of me most of the time, but was a great guy. He pushed thru a promotion for me, the day I left for Germany.
A lot of Germans still won't eat corn.
An interesting read, is about the Russians, them starving, with sorage units full of grain. Seems it wasn't ground info flour, so they didn't recognize it as food.
JOAT Everything happens for a reason, except possibly football. - Lu-Tze
Life just ain't life without good music. - JOAT Web Page Update 23 Jul 2003. Some tunes I like. http://community-2.webtv.net/Jakofalltrades/JOATorJackOfAll/page4.html
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net says...

Actually pigs can't digest corn very well either unless it is ground or they have cracked it while chewing (whole kernels pass right through). That's why farmers have grinder/mixers: to make the grains more digest-able and thus get more nutrition per dollar spent on feed -- works the same for humans too, whole corn passes through, ground corn (or chewed well) will be digested.
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snip Lew Hodgett wrote:

When I hunted deer I used to make my own sausage all the time. Nowadays I just put burger and pork together with fennel and sage and fake it. You're right though about the chorizos. They're OK in their place but it isn't next to eggs. I put one of those "I Love GRITS" bumper sticks on the rubbermaid box in the back of my truck - the one for groceries, so they don't go sliding under the toolboxes, and she went ballistic on me. "That's disrespectful for girls!" Girls Raised In The South - GRITS. 'Course her rabbits outsmart her by heading her off at the door to her room so they can get out and roam the house. I swear the predator gene skipped a generation or something. Outsmarted my a rabbit - Where'd I go wrong! Dave in Fairfax
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snipped-for-privacy@fairfax.com wrote:

Here ya go Dave:
PASTIES
Crust: 8 Cups of flour 3 1/2 cups shortening (Crisco) 2 tsp. salt 1 cup water 2 large eggs 2 Tablespoons vinegar
Mix flour, shortening and salt well and add remaining ingredients. Do not handle dough more than necessary. Roll out dough into 9 inch circles. Put 8 - 10 ounces of pastie mixture on half of the dough, put a small pat of BUTTER on top of pastie mixture. Fold over top: tuck dough under the ingredients with side of hand. Fold crust up: crimp like pie crust. Carefully put each pastie on a cookie sheet. (Make an EGG wash: 1 large egg and 1/2 cup water,beat well). Brush each pastie with egg wash and make a small slit the top of each pastie for steam to escape. Bake 45 to 60 minutes at 400 degree oven. Makes 10 - 12 Pasties. (Can make Pastie Pies)
PASTIE MIXTURE:
2 1/2 lbs. cubed round steak or ground pastie meat 2 1/2 lbs. cubed (small) rutabaga 1 1/2 lbs. cubed carrots 2 1/2 lbs. cubed potatoes 3 large Onions, chopped. Salt and pepper to taste
They serve this with catsup, or you could use beef gravy. Also serve with coleslaw. The smell of these baking is to die for!
Enjoy!
Scott
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You mean there is a pie crust on this planet not made with lard that doesn't taste like rejected shoe leather?
Lard, cold water and not kneading the dough to death are as basic to a good pie crust as breathing is to staying alive IMHO.
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Lew

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Scott Brownell wrote:

I lived in Portage for most of my childhood, where in Kalamazoo do you live I see 3 Brownells, but no Scott. Which Harding's did you go to, I worked in a couple of them when i was in HS? The filling came out great, a little bland, but it's fixable, the shell was flaky, but to a fault. Hard to pick up. I'll try again. Sorry about the singlehood, I'd send you my ex's address so that she could cook for you, but the high point of her cooking was "Does unwrap mean take the plastic off or leave it on?" Honest. Dave in Fairfax
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snipped-for-privacy@fairfax.com wrote:

I grew up in Portage, graduated in '65. Dad & youngest brother both live on Austin Lake and the middle brother lives west of Vicksburg. I knew Mel Harding, went to school & graduated with his daughter, Judy. She owns the H&B store across from West Lake. Tom Harding is president of the Harding stores now, AFAIK. The store I went to is in Osthemo, just the typical nice little store that they've always been, I hate Meijer's etc. because of the hubbub. When I was in HS I worked at Family Foods..long gone now but maybe you remember.
I live 6 miles west of US 131, and about a mile south of M-43, on 10 acres. Old farmouse with a separate 24x24 shop that I've hardly seen the inside of over the past 8 months, been helping my 1st wife of 30+ years ago (had 2 of them critters..don't need no 'mo..LOL!) with a house she purchased..the closest I've been to doing woodworking for the past 6 months was last week when I screwed down better than half of a 16x16 deck that the previous owner had installed a screw here & there on, and then reworking/repairing a small 8x8 yard shed. Did I mention I HATE wallpapering??
Glad to hear the pasty's came out reasonably well. Like you say, it all sounds fixable. I looked at the packaging on the one I bought yesterday and it listed a website: www.pasty.com. It was really good! Weight was 15 oz., cost me $2.49. 45 minutes in the toaster oven & I was in heaven!
Small world! Wouldn't happen to have a sister named Barb would you?
Scott
P.S. Email above is good if you'd like to take this off list.
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snip Gnube wrote:

I love the ones with the partition in the middle. The only way you get like that though is to make them yourself or go to a person who'll do it for you. Store and such just don't take the time and care. Besides, a machine'd probably put the decoration on the wrong end. Dave in Fairfax
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snipped-for-privacy@fairfax.com wrote:

Well now Dave, you've finally hit upon a topic with which i have a modicum of experience (in other words, not woodworking <G>).
Having thoroughly enjoyed authentic UP pastie (from a coworker from Marquette), I can state with no fear of contradiction that the Best Place to get a pastie is on the Cornwall coast of England. This culinary experience happens most preferrably on a damp, windy day (read: their version of high summer) with the lubricant being a freshly pulled pint of local ale.
All the best, Rob Weaver
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says...

A few miles from my abode in SoCal, there is an honest English pasty shop: you can watch them being made thru the glass! The small size will feed two people well, the large will feed an army!
And, fortunately, Belgian style saison ale is readily available!
Kim
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snip Rob Weaver wrote:

Gosh, I'm not sure if that means you didn't like the UP Brand ones or if you thought the Cornish were better. My Dad's family are Brits, Mom's are Russian, so I grew up with a strange mix of foods. I still this the best desert for a meal of pasties is baklava. Got to agree with Kim though, Cornwall is a bit of a drive. Some good cellar temp stout would go down nice with the weather we've been having. Guiness is OK, but it loses something during the journey. Dave in Fairfax
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