OT: Bought SDS rotary hammer, keep hammerdrill?


I had to do some repairs to my slab and needed a powered chisel, so I bought a very nice 1" Makita SDS rotary hammer. I also have a 1/2" Milwaukee hammerdrill with an ordinary chuck. Now that I have the rotary hammer, is there any value in keeping the hammerdrill? The only time I've used an ordinary shank bit is when I got a package of Tapcons which contained a bit. I know there are SDS bits of that size. Will I miss out on something in the future if I put my hammerdrill on ebay?
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Get rid of the hammer drill with the ordinary chuck.
I switched to SDS & never looked back.
cheers Bob
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_Sell_ tools ?!
How fast does your SDS drill turn ? Mine is quick, because I paid a lot of extra money to get a 2-speed. Most of them though only rotate slowly, too slowly for happily drilling small holes in metal.
On old drill on eBay is going to bring in $5 on a good day. It's hardly worth it, you might as well keep it.
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They are two different tools. The hammer drill is better for the smaller holes, maybe 1/4" or so, plus you can use it in the straight drill mode with regular bits. The SDS is a pure hammer IE it has a striker piston hitting the work piece(drill). That enables it to turn slower to accomplish the same job. Plus because it turns slower than the hammer drill, your bit won't burn up and will last longer. Also, SDS bits, are designed with a double "taper" to the point. Again because the bit is made to pulverize the work, the turning it just to clean out the hole. A hammer drill bit has just a single edge that dulls quickly.
AL wrote:

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