once more on pneumonia

Just a thought. Since it's so difficult to tell pneumonia from the flu and its ilk, I bought one of the little O2 sensors that fits over a finger. I'm using it now to measure my progress at getting off the oxygen, but in the future I'll use it as a check when I have "flu". If my O2 level goes below 90, I'll call the doctor.
A cheap investment - cost about $20 and up on Amazon:
(Amazon.com product link shortened) ref=sr_1_1?s=hpc&ie=UTF8&qid98011790&sr=1-1&keywords=o2+sensor
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"Larry Blanchard" wrote:

----------------------------------------------------------- Are you sure you want to wait until your O2 level drops to 90?
When ever they take a dissolved O2 level on me, anything below about 92-93 is a cause to monitor.
Lew
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On Sun, 20 Apr 2014 15:40:47 -0700, Lew Hodgett wrote:

The docs do like it to be 95 or better. But I'm thinking that even a cold or a flu is going to drop it some. From what I've been able to find out, there's no lasting damage until it goes below 90 or 88 or 85 (different opinions) and stays there for a while.
Mine was 63 when they put me in the hospital :-).
Right now, on oxygen, mine is 90-95 when resting. If I go work in the shop it goes down to 88 or so momentarily and then gradually up all the way to 98. Go figure.
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On 4/20/2014 7:06 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Oxygen is covered by Medicare if you meet the qualifications.
In order to qualify for medical oxygen that is covered by Medicare, oxygen must be needed on an ongoing basis and it must be used in the home. There are other requirements as well:
You must have a severe lung disease or other condition that impairs your breathing. It must also be well-documented in your medical record.
You must have a health condition that may be improved by using oxygen.
You must have a PaO2 (as measured by arterial blood gases) that is less than or equal to 55 mg Hg (normal is 75-100 mg Hg) and a documented oxygen saturation level of 88% or less while awake, or that drops to these levels for at least 5 minutes during sleep.
You must have tried alternative methods to improve your oxygenation, or they should have at least been considered and then deemed ineffective by your physician.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

"Larry Blanchard" wrote:

Yep, same here ------------------------------------- But I'm thinking that even

I don't want to find out. Prefer to do what is necessary to stay in the mid 90s. -----------------------------------------

Ouch! You were headed for serious trouble. ------------------------------------

So stay out of the shop until you get a clean bill of health.
Sounds like that might be tough for you to do<G>.
Lew
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