On Topic: What to make to hone skills

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wrote:

I am starting to think I am more of a Neaderthal. I guess! I have played with hand cut dovetails and even though they sort of look like a three-year-old cut some of them, I really liked it. I think I like the PROCESS the most. I love the quiet, too. It was just relaxing. Does that make me a neander? Maybe it does...I haven't really, really thought about that before but maybe you are on to something...

Oops! I guess I answered that one already! :o)

I have an okay vise I got for $20. As far as vices...well...need to ask the wife.
Maybe I am a cheap b^st^rd but I don't have the money at this point in time. I think I need to learn how to do things right at first then move on to the toys. Who knows! LOL!!! I think no matter which way ya go, it is a slippery slope.
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Now that I have distanced myself from "Bigger, Better, Faster' type of thinking, I have found myself in the delicate balance of using modern day technology to achieve old world results. To wit:
I have bought a set of scraper blades >>>> so I can remove, delicately, the machining marks from my cnc. That cnc is really nothing more than a 'roughing' machine. It gives me a chunk of wood that then needs to be coddled, scraped, fondled in neanderthal ways. Then finished with BLO and waxes and shit.
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Oh, and btw, I feel a bit oafy about getting caught up in the 'neil' debacle myself. I hope the 'Crew' here can cut me a little slack.
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"Robatoy" wrote:

that then needs to be coddled, scraped, fondled in neanderthal ways. Then finished with BLO and waxes and shit. ---------------------------- White oak, BLO cut with turps and bees wax also cut with turps is a tough package to beat IMHO.
Lew
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Ayup! Neander, you are.

;-)
Well, we always have to ask the wife.

I've been there. I think we all have. Yes, it certainly is a slippery slope. Pilgramige to Woodcraft (Birmingham) set for this weekend. ;-)
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"busbus" wrote: However, I do not agree with the last statement. The biggest reason is that I do not necessarily have the extra cash laying around, especially since I have a kid starting college in a couple weeks and another one ready to go in another couple years, so I will be "poor" for a while. ----------------------------------- Stick around.
Your position WILL change.
Lew
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who really cares if that part doesn't fit so well."
Who cares? You cares - or should. Really, the shop layout and accouterments should offer you practice in as fine a woodworking as you are able. I learned and practiced various techniques building boxes to hold my precious and semi-precious tools using whatever wood I had and found along the way. More often than not, each was made of a collection of wood species and, yes, even some bits of hardboard, plywood or particle board.
Boxes that were designed only to hold that one tool and keep it high, dry and sawdust free while not looking too bad upon the shelf. Yes, I finished each - had to learn that, too.
Shelving is another area that would provide opportunities to hone your skills. And, then, nifty parts boxes to hold all that crap you're holding onto for a project well-intended if not ready to build today.
The wood species is relatively immaterial. Over time, you'll likely "find" a piece of this or a scrap of that so as to experience several varieties as you go.
Oh, yes, little gifties are great. Give someone the bird (feeder) you designed, built and finished yourself. Last year Lowes was selling miniature (3.5"??) "Vise Grip" knockoffs for a buck ninety-eight. I used the router to create a cavity in some scrap Walnut and made little boxes that just fit the tiny tools and gave them to neighbors I like.
Big Projects are just lots of little projects well-hung together.
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wrote:

who really cares if that part doesn't fit so well."
Who cares? You cares - or should. Really, the shop layout and accouterments should offer you practice in as fine a woodworking as you are able. I learned and practiced various techniques building boxes to hold my precious and semi-precious tools using whatever wood I had and found along the way. More often than not, each was made of a collection of wood species and, yes, even some bits of hardboard, plywood or particle board.
Boxes that were designed only to hold that one tool and keep it high, dry and sawdust free while not looking too bad upon the shelf. Yes, I finished each - had to learn that, too.
Shelving is another area that would provide opportunities to hone your skills. And, then, nifty parts boxes to hold all that crap you're holding onto for a project well-intended if not ready to build today.
The wood species is relatively immaterial. Over time, you'll likely "find" a piece of this or a scrap of that so as to experience several varieties as you go.
Oh, yes, little gifties are great. Give someone the bird (feeder) you designed, built and finished yourself. Last year Lowes was selling miniature (3.5"??) "Vise Grip" knockoffs for a buck ninety-eight. I used the router to create a cavity in some scrap Walnut and made little boxes that just fit the tiny tools and gave them to neighbors I like.
Big Projects are just lots of little projects well-hung together.
Good ideas Hoosierpopi, as I recall having problems keeping my tools organized. My need to organize and store led me to build my first cabinets as a younger carpenter. Honestly, they were not properly built as I didn't have any good mentors, or I failed to seek out help -arrogance is not such a good thing :-(
I built some tool storage cabinets that were too large to move (should have sectioned them). I used some crappy drawer slides that didn't work well in the long term. Cost was a big item so I used A-boy Fir and CD plywood. I had no cloo about building raised panel anything, so I just put plywood doors and drawer fronts on everything.
I had only one contractor table saw, a "skil saw", one small router, one stapler, one B&D "ScruGun", and a 10" Makita miter saw. And of course some hand tools (not many). BTW, when I was working around other framers, they thought I was rich cuz I had tools they didn't have!
But every shop, home or industrial, needs proper tool/supplies storage. Some bigger shops are not so well organized, and others have taken time to use their trade to get their acts together because it is more efficient generally easier.
With the help of the internet and woodworking groups, it is now much easier to find information on what you want to do. You can also find local help at cabinet shops where some might be more than willing to guide you if you have a problem. (hobby shops like woodcraft will gladly guide you into buying a tool but most who work there haven't done more than craft stuff).
The main thing is to have fun, isn't it?
Have a good day, woodstuff
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