number of coats of Tung oil

I'm finishing a project made of mostly Black Walnut and I'm using Minwax Tung Oil finish. I'm wondering how many coats people typically recommend. I've heard as few as 2, and others who suggest many more.
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I used five on this one: http://www.garagewoodworks.com/Dresser_Project.htm also made from black walnut. More than enough coats. Too many and it will start to look glossy.
I rubbed mine down lightly with 0000 steel wool after curing.
--
www.garagewoodworks.com



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Followed his suggestion on black walnut blanket chest and the results stunned me. Not sure if I ever thanked him though... Thanks
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I used pure tung oil and started at 25% oil 75% mineral spirits gradually increase to 75% oil 25 mineral. Not sure about minwax stuff.
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not a film finish. Once you have saturated it (one or two applications ought to do it) you are just putting gunk on your project. But perhaps you are taking off all the dried oil with the steel wool.
But of course that doesn't address the OP's question. He is talking about tung oil finish, not tung oil. tof is mainly poly.
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oh
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I was really impressed with the way YOU addressed the OP's question.

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might know how to use it.
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: :>> But of course that doesn't address the OP's question. He is talking :>> about tung oil finish, not tung oil. tof is mainly poly.:> :> I was really impressed with the way YOU addressed the OP's question.:> : Suggesting he follow the directions on the can? Yeah, the folks at Minwax : might know how to use it.
Although in general it's true following the can directions is smart, there's a realy good article in the current Woodwork about this with some examples of truly bad directions and information on finish cans.
    -- Andy Barss
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right than what people here feel is right.. I stress, "more likely".
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Why not follow the directions on the can?
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Precedent? Following the directions on Minwax Antique Oil generally results in a sticky mess that takes a year to dry. Laying it on light and buffing it in produces a nice low gloss sheen. Minwax "Tung Oil Finish" is likely a very similar varnish-fortified oil.
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I'm

product, yet you continue to buy that company's products?!?! Amazing.
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Because the product is cheap, consistent, and it works?
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I'm

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I'm going to guess that Minwax knows exactly what they're doing. AO is one of their oldest products. What works for them, however, may not work for everyone, due to environmental factors, probably.
All finishes need tweaking of application technique, oils especially. This is a more apparent example. Should come as no surprise.
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We put on three, but it's Millie's polymerized and that's what they say to put on.
JP
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Doug wrote:

When it looks good to you, stop.
--

dadiOH
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I'm not familiar with the product but I suspect it's not straight tung oil. It's probably a combination of tung and poly. If the finished piece is away from direct sunlight and moisture, then you can probably get by with two coats. I use a combination of tung, poly and linseed oil and I usually apply four coats. I recently finished a black walnut bathroom sink cabinet with six coats Remember, aesthetic appeal is not the only reason you finish a piece. The primary job of a finish is wood protection. If you don't feel like you have enough finish on the piece, then you probably don't.
Cheers, Jeff
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just completed a top for an old cast iron Singer sewing machine base; mahogany with maple inlay, and used that same finish. I did 5 coats, rubbed with 0000 steel wool between each. It got deeper and richer with each coat; I could have kept going but had to call it a day one day. That finish looks beautiful on mahogany btw.
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