Non-wood anchorage for wood mailbox post


I am planning to install a new maibox and I would like to make the post out of wood and add some nice design elements. The vinyl and metal mailbox posts that you can find at the BORG are rather drab (yet expensive). The one advantage that they have over wooden mailbox posts are their resistance to rot. Even if I used pressure treated wood, treated cedar, or fir I'm sure I would be replacing it in a few years. The post will need to be anchored in concrete because of all the heaving and freeze/thaw cycles that we get here in Wisconsin. Even the best wooden post will eventually tend to rot near the ground in this climate when set in concrete because of how the moisture gets trapped at the base. What I would like to do is use a metal anchorage constructed from angle iron or similar material and set that in the concrete. The wooden post could then be secured to the angle iron. If some day I need to replace the post because of rot (or if SWMBOs taste suddenly changes) I won't have to be chipping out and re-pouring my concrete base. I'll just need to unbolt my wooden post and reattach a new one.
Any thoughts? Does something like this already exist in stores or should I polish my metalworking skills? Is there a downside to this approach that I am missing?
Thanks.
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There are "breakaway" mounting systems. These are metal bases that are monted in concrete and have wooded posts attached. The theory is that any mailbox post will eventually be run over by a car. This breakaway design allows for a quick replacement.
I have seen a number of commercial product that would do what you propose.
But even if you had to build something yourself.it should not be a problem. I would just use some flat stock above the concrete with something bent or welded across it below the concrete. You don't want any protuding metal edges under a mailbox. Make sure that you use a good paint on the metal.
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Try making a "receiver" make a post for forming in concrete, cover it with releasing agent, mix your concrete stout so that is doesn't have much slump. Pour and form your rock let it set a few minutes and wiggle out the post reaming it around somewhat to make room for sliding replacements in and out easily. I live in WI as well and have lost several mailbox mounts to Mr.Plow. This works pretty slick. You can also modify this design to have a pipe sticking out of the concrete and you just drill a hole vertically in from the bottom of the post and you can change that thing out in minutes...
Knothead
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Troutbeer wrote:
<snip>

See:
http://doityourself.com/store/u590927.htm
Your local hardware store should sell something similar.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
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Simpson.
Can be had at any Borg
http://www.strongtie.com/products/categories/post_bases.html
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I have used the Simpson base on a porch where the top is captive. Works great in that application. I don't know how steady it will be with a box on a post held only by the screws/nails nailed into the bottom.
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Use the column base (CB) http://www.strongtie.com/products/connectors/LCB-CB.html Usually they use through bolts.
plenty steady for a mailbox.
j
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What I've done when putting something in the ground that I might want to move later is use two stacked concrete blocks, underground. The post is wedged into the northwest corner of one of the blocks, and the southeast corner of the second block, and each of the block's hollow areas is filled with gravel to help brace everything. It's hard to describe how the blocks are used -- but essentially they form a "V", with the only overlap being the point of the "V", which is where the post goes down through the blocks. Each of the blocks steadies the post in two directions, and the dirt packed around and over the blocks keeps everything in place.
This arrangement has been good enought for a 20' pole with a purple martin house at the top, for several years and through more than a few hurricanes and thunderstorms, and when I wanted to change the location it was easy to dig up and move to another spot.

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My mail box post is a pressure treated 4x4 and has been in the ground about 20 years with no sign of decay.
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I have a mailbox and post made by Rubbermaid and available at Wal Mart, and the like. The post is just driven into the ground, no concrete needed, then the top section is inserted. It has been in place for years now and has never moved even with some snow plowing. I'd use that and then trim around with the wood and mount the box on top. .
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Hmmmm. Mailbox post - now that brings back a few good old wreck memories!
PDX David :-)
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Careful, we've had serious mailbox trouble here before. :)

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Saw an ad on TV today that was promoting "baseball bat proof" mail boxes. Didn't take note of where to get one because I don't need one, but I could envision its sales potential.
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