Nitrogen powered air tools.

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snipped-for-privacy@codesmiths.com wrote:

Thanks for the replies everyone. I'm going to digest this for a while. Further bulletins as events warrant.
JP
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On Mon, 10 Oct 2005 07:51:17 -0700, Jay Pique wrote:

Do pneumatic tools exhaust the gas at the tool? One might want to consider whether the driving gas supports life before using too much of it in an enclosed space. Just a thought.
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First, Yes, Nitrogen will work fine, regulators are available at most every welding supply stores or online. Second, why? For big jobs, an air compressor is the only way to go. With the new, light weight polyurethane hoses you can easily run out a 100' of 1/4 hose.
Lastly, think Paslode for short difficult to get a hose too job.
Dave
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Nitrogen can be used for tools. Depending on the reason maybe not the best . Spray gun for paint might be very good. If you can not tolerate moisture showing up in or on the product might be good. Hospital ORs use nitrogen for certain tools ( Saws ) and they have a medical air systems. Air that compressed in a pump with a water seal so NO oil gets into the air supply. ( pretty darn near spotless) . Also use air driers on control air lines for building controls. Those pesky little controllers just cannot deal with moisture. Good refrigerated air drier depending on cfm can be pricey. Lugging a nitrogen tank around is not much fun either. Ever consider the use of wheels to move an air compressor. ? Now if you can not put wheels on the air compressor, you better call for one of those trucks you see on the road delivering to supply houses and Hospitals. Check with your local welding supply house, if they don't have what you want then YOU don't need it.
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wrote:

Add a moisture trap to your compressor. If that is not enough, add an air dryer--much less $ and no dealing with tank transports.
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Jay Pique wrote:

Nitrogen would have zero water in it. When I used to airbrush, I would hook up directly to a nitrogen tank with a regulator without a moisture trap just because of this advantage.
As far as regulators, just google it. Tons of companies sell regulators for nitrogen.
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JP,
Yes N2 can be used to power tools and their are regulators available to make that happen (from the same place you get the N2). I fix medical equipment (the job I use to pay for my woodworking habit), and I can tell you that all those fun tools used in surgery are powered by N2. They use it because it is clean, it is dry and it is non-reactive (that is to say that it won't feed a fire). However it is pricey, compared to using a compressor with a moisture trap, which is what dentists use to power their "handpieces" (God forbid we call them drills).
John C.

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Anyone seriously looking at nitrogen power for air tools look into Atlas Copco as they now make a rotary screw air compressor that is putting out nitrogen. We install them in tire shops and they allow you t o use compressed air or nitrogen. I am an Atlas Copco factory service tech and they make a pretty good compressor. If you are looking for just oil free air then the SF unit is more for you. Any one have any questions let me know.
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