Next plane?

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I want to get a small plane from LV; either the apron plane or standard block plane, or maybe the LA block plane.
I've got a shoulder plane and LA smoother. Without buying one of EVERYTHING, which one in the first paragraph would you not want to be without. Someday, I'll get more, and more, but for NOW, which one do YOU think is indispensable. In a perfect world, I'd already own each one of LV's planes. :)
Dave
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I went with the low angle block plane and have not been sorry.
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Hi Dave,
You might want to look at this article
http://home.pacbell.net/paulcomi/Spectaculartrim/Woodworking/rfeeser_article_on_hand_planes.htm
I have a Stanley jack and a Veritas low angle block plane. Seems like a standard combo. Now I want a shoulder plane!
-Peter
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- What I've learned about sharpening plane blades http://members.shaw.ca/petermichaux/workshop/BevelDownSharpening.html
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Peter, a special thanks to you for the link! I spent a good deal of time reading the descriptions of each plane and their functions. I even read up a bit on wooden planes.
At this point I'm leaning towards the block or LA block instead of the apron plane.
Dave

http://home.pacbell.net/paulcomi/Spectaculartrim/Woodworking/rfeeser_article_on_hand_planes.htm
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Why not try out a nice handmade plane from one of the frequent posters here? Variety is the spice of life.
-j
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Good plan ! I'm going to make myself a little smoother out of that dense (if somewhat unstable) blockhead, BAD. Then an inset strikeblock of V. kuhnia.
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Dave,
I can't give you a comparison between the LV planes because I only have the apron plane with the A2 steel but I can tell you that I have been very happy with it. I think I may go the the standard block plane next, or possibly a smoother. Have fun.
Dale
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standard

Well, some of us DO go overboard at times. I have, or did have, one of each.
The apron plane is a sweet, small trimmer, always at hand when just a little dab needs to be taken off. It's a low angle plane, better on end grain than edge grain.
The LV standard angle block is a good bit larger, every bit as good a plane, and more adjustable. I bought it for my dad, to 'replace' the funky Stanley Handyman block plane I'd liberated from his toolbox 15 years earlier. He 'keeps it in my shop', he says, because that's the only time he does anything remotely fine woodworking. I keep it sharp, and rust free.
The LV LA block plane lasted 2 weeks, before I gave it to the father of one of my son's wife. He admired its beauty and versatility, so I gave it to him. He was overjoyed, uses it frequently, and brought me a minty pre-WW2 Stanley #7 that was excess to his needs. (We get along well. He's a good wood scrounge, and has been know to drop by with really turning stock, just because he can't stand to see it burned as firewood.)
The plane that gets used most often in this range, in my shop, is the LN 9 1/2, standard angle adjustable mouth block.
http://www.lie-nielsen.com/tool.html?id `_5
It fits my hand, does everything asked of it, and feels good doing it. It's narrower than the LV, somewhat lighter feeling, although the mass is concentrated, and really, really well made. I keep a second blade sharpened at a higher angle for nasty woods. $135 from any number of sellers.
Those are all nice tools, and you don't need all of them. Neither do I, or the three other Stanley block planes that are kicking around, or are part of the 'traveling kit'. Were I to add another small plane, it would almost certainly be one of Steve Knight's new small finishing planes, with the brass screw cap. But that's a want, not a need, for me. The coffin smoother (50* padauk) he built for me last year is one sweet tool.
So many options. Such a joy to use.
Patriarch
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LA block. With the adjustable mouth.
I don't see a function for the apron plane. Maybe for equipping a well-heeled school workshop. I'm sure it's a good plane, but the others are just even better.
--
Cats have nine lives, which is why they rarely post to Usenet.

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My voice to the chorus for the low-angle. Only advantage to the standard angle is that it can be used to remove wood faster, when necessary.
As to apron versus standard? Standard carries in one of those gore-tex belt pouches, too. Used to do it.
If you just want tiny to touch up a corner or chamfer a tenon end, get the Kuntz or other brand palm plane. It's so small you can wear it as jewelry.
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David wrote:

LA block would be my next purchase.
Barry
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As with others here, the LA block. It's very versatile. You might think about getting the chamfer attachment for it as well -- I like that a lot, it works really well. Will teach you to read grain. DAMHIKT.
Regards,
JT
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Thanks to everyone for your recommendations. I'll skip the apron plane and go with a block.
I'd love to have the large shoulder plane, too. sigh... <g>
Dave
David wrote:

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Hi Dave -
My choice would be Apron plane... I use that more than my LA Block....High Carbon blade to boot...
Cheers -
Rob

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Robin Lee wrote:

Oh sure ... but what do you know about them anyway? (Hi, Rob ... so when's the honing guide hitting the streets? :-)
It's funny that you would pick the apron plane. That's the one plane of yours that has seen very little use in my shop.
But I must admit, when I needed to level the laminations after glueup for a trout net I was making, it was exactly the right tool. I was able to "stop on a dime" and work the curve without getting any tearout as the grain direction changed. I expect it might be nice for bamboo rodmaking or guitarmaking as well.
Chuck Vance (but give me the LV LA for my everyday block plane)
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On Thu, 05 May 2005 13:56:35 -0500, Conan The Librarian

If I had one I'd probably use it (I might even buy one yet, for on-site toolbag duty). The question for most of us isn't which one to _use_, it's which one to _buy_.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

on-site
Sure, and that's why I made my post in the first place. I couldn't recommend it as the "next plane" to buy, given my experience.
Or have I missed your point altogether?
Chuck Vance
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wrote:

My point is that Robin Lee probably has a bigger and better-stocked tool cabinet than most of us. His choice of what to use isn't necessarily relevant for the rest of us.
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I'm also having trouble comprehending this. Sure, he may have one of each of the Veritas planes, but he still uses the apron plane the most. Must be a reason.
Maybe if you answered a couple of questions I could follow you better. If I had an apron plane as well as a smoother, a jack plane, shoulder plane and rabbet plane, what one should I use to break a sharp edge?
If I had one each of every tool in the Lee Valley catalog, what would be a good tool to use for that same operation?
Seems to me, no matter how big the tool selection, for many uses the apron plane could be a good choice.
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wrote:

Obviously the apron plane. However the question here is whether a limited budget is best spent on an apron plane, or the LA block. The budget won't stretch to two.
There's very little the apron blane will do better than the LA block (surviving in a toolbag is about the best). There's a lot the adjustable mouth on the LA allows you to do that the apron can't. So if you're limited to one, I'd get the LA even if I had to spend a little more on it.
Where I'm buying a lot (school outfitting) and there's the option to have _one_ LA in the "special tools" cupboard, then the apron looks more appropriate. If I had spare money I might even buy one myself to live in the toolbag and leave the LA on my bench.
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