Newbie question about joints


Ok I am looking to getting into woodwoorking, cruently pricing jointers. planers, and table saws (there is a mill right down the road that I can get mixed HW 1x6 9ft long for a buck a board) and I was just wondering if there is a tool out there I should be looking into that makes like a tougn and grove egdes to wood for you can join them together, or how you would go about joing boards together to make like a table that wont have gaps.
Deborah
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Deborah Kelly,
You can use a router with a tongue and groove bit. They look like this http://www.newwoodworker.com/reviews/inftngbirvu.html
Lex

get
there
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Router Glue Bit, T&G! There's dozens of ways
http://www.grizzly.com/products/items-list.cfm?key1230&sort=price

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On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 23:07:13 -0600, "Deborah Kelly"

No need for T&G, just properly jointed boards, edges glued to each other. I suggest you get yourself a good book or maybe take a course.
Go to: http://woodworking.homeip.net/wood /
and click on reference books on the frame on the left. A favourite here is Tage Frid's series.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html
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I was disappointed with Tage's book #3. The books 1&2 convinced me that #3 would be as good but it fell short for me.
wrote:

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I searched for that book, least was $49.94 used and most was around $160. I think it was recently out of print. So I am now borrowing it from the library and scanning it. It will be a pdf soon.
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Alex
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Actually I would not hesitate to race to that mill and get that lumber as fast as I could at that price... simply get there, I suggest.
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Deborah Kelly wrote:

You should be able to find about a zillion T&G planes up there in Maine for very reasonable prices. That's assuming that you don't like tailed tools. Otherwise a router is the first thing that comes to mind. OTOH, a rubbed joint should do what you want, and that can be done with a jointer, a jointer plane, or a router. There are lots of ways to skin this cat, how much do you like noise is the starting point.
Dave in Fairfax
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Get the machines that you have listed and simply glue the boards up edge to edge. No need for tongue and groove for a table top.
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Deborah Kelly wrote:

As a newby you are asking the wrong question by focusing on tongue and groove. That type of joint wastes too much wood, just a straight cut with biscuits to help alignment or 1/4" grooves is both boards with a 1/4" plywood slip saves wood and helps alignment. There are other ways also to help alignment.
You can get straight edges with a table saw or a jointer (a table saw is easier). If the boards are not warped you don't need a jointer, but you will likely need a planer and it will certainly help.
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