Newbe Question about Shop Heater

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I have an attached 400 ft^2 (20' by 20') 2-car garage with an (electric) insulated garage door.
What is a smart way to warm it up (to say 60 degrees)? Options appear to be kerosene, propane and electric. I assume that propane may be the cleanest and/or cheapest. How concerned should I be about exhaust fumes (at this point, they concern me)?
The garage has some unfinished walls and a finished ceiling. Is occasionally warming it up likely to produce condensation on walls and lead to their damage? I assume that unprotected metal will be even more at risk.
Thank you for your thoughts, Bill
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Bill wrote:

Solar - no fuel, no fumes, no condensation, and always warm.
(Very biased opinion)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 15:04:22 -0600, the infamous Morris Dovey

PV and electric, right? <gd&r>
--
Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight
very clean. It's perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Troublemaker! ;)
I really like the idea of being able to permanently buy-down energy costs, but PV doesn't seem quite ready for that yet - except for far off-grid locations where the cost of extending the grid would be comparable to the cost of the panels.
PV technology is poised to take off as soon as we produce either of two breakthroughs: [1] a halving of production cost or, [2] a significant improvement in conversion efficiency. One or both of those /will/ take place, but the headache with breakthroughs is that they happen on their own schedule - either could happen today, or (with equal probability) 200 years from today.
Solar thermal technology, on the other hand, doesn't need either of those breakthroughs - only the effort to put it into use where it offers some real advantage over other technologies.
I don't see the two as competitive - I just lack the patience for waiting quietly until someone else comes up with a breakthrough.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Bill I found that garage doors can be very drafty. With a draft you may never warm it up. About 10 years ago I replaced my garage door with a Wayne Dalton insulated door, expanding foam between an outer and inner steel layer. Additionally the door has weather stripping around the perimeter to prevent drafts. I find that a small 1500 watt ceramic electric heater can warm the garage to comfortable in about 10 minutes. Other than the door that faces north, the garage is not insulated except on the back wall which separates it from the rest of the house. I worked in a large ware house that used 2 kerosene heaters, they in no way are ever close to warming the building. They did provide a warm spot to take the chill off but I recall the fumes gave most every one a head ache.
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Thank you to everyone for your replies. The ceiling is partially-insulated, but the walls are not (except for the one which is attached to the house). Maybe I'll add some to the ceiling. Gas is nearby; my hot water heater uses it, but that's all. I'm not a big fan of NG. Since you've convinced me that a propane furnace without proper ventilation is unsafe, an electric heater seems the more practical for the time being. I'll read all of the posts again, thank you!
Bill
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Convection electric heat is clean too.
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Convection electric heat is clean too.
Good point!
I just typed in "Convection electric heat" (google search), and this product came up:
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productIdB203-63981-HV-0513F&detail=&lpage=none
Looks appealing--even has a thermostat and auto-shutoff. I had been under the impression that using electricity was a costly way to create heat. I guess I can try the math: this thing is 1500W = 1.5kW, and it looks like I pay less than 10 cents per kWh, and that would come out to 15 cents per hour. Better than I would have expected; quiet too I assume. Please correct my calculations if I overlooked something (my home-owners insurance is paid up! )!
Bill
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Bill wrote:

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productIdB203-63981-HV-0513F&detail=&lpage=none
That's not a lot of heat, and satisfaction is likely to depend on how well insulated and how draft-free your garage is.
Since warm air rises, I'd suggest taking notbob's advice and also buying one of these:
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId)4968-61843-220140&lpage=none
A lifetime warranty and $19.95 price are attractive.
(I don't have any connection with Lowes)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productIdB203-63981-HV-0513F&detail=&lpage=none
The only thing you are overlooking is the Btu output. In my garage, it would raise the temperature about 1 degree.
1500 W = 5100 BTU
I use a 35,000 BTU propane heater and if it is very cold I still cannot get it to a working temperature. Given the cost of electricity in my area, that comes out to about $1.15 an hour if I had enough power to run electric heat.
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wrote in message

Well, what do you mean by "very cold"? Considering how few days it is very cold in central IN, I can do something else on those days. About how much do you pay per kWh in your neck of the woods?
Bill
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I can get a 30 degree rise. That means much below 30, the shop is cold. At 10F, the shop will reach 40F. Electric in my area is about 19.
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On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 23:00:09 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

You must have a very large garage or not have much in the way of insulation. I have a much smaller shop, but 5000 BTUs will overheat it in about 3 hours with an outside temperatuure of 30F. Thats about 3.5-4.0 BTUs per cubic foot.
At that efficiency 35K BTUs would heat 10,000 cubic feet. Or 1000 square feet with a 10 foot ceiling. That's plenty for a 2 car garage.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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Just got this in a newsletter...
<http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/woodnews/2009november/heater.html
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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-MIKE- wrote:

I've tried 'em--not worth a crap if it's really cold and have any volume of any size to heat--can't stand in front of the dam'd thing _all_ the time. Plus, if you get close enough to warm one side, it's soon imitating crispy-critter while your other side might as well be dark side of moon. :(
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dpb wrote:

Like sitting in front of a campfire, huh?
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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-MIKE- wrote:

Ayup...sorta' but w/o the marshmallows... :(
The other worst part ( ;> ) in a shop is that nothing _in_ the shop warms up unless it's in direct line-of-sight. Since don't ever get much actual air temperature rise, all that cast iron just continues to radiate back as well and so it doesn't really warm up overall, either. Meanwhile, a black cast arbor wrench laying in front of the thing for a couple hours might end up hot enough on the near side to make you yelp when pick it up.
They only give the impression that you have as the guy says in the review of standing in the sun. That's good to a point but they're just not adequate as the primary heat source unless one can be where it is essentially continuously and not too close, not too far away.
At least that's my opinion after having a couple offered from an estate and figuring they'd be a help...in the end, they really didn't make any generally useful contribution other than being able to go over and stick hands in front of one of 'em for a while.
I didn't make it this year, but hopefully by next, I'll extend the gas line from the hog house to the barn and put in another ceiling heater for the shop area. What I didn't get done was anything about being able to close an area off so not trying to heat the whole bloody thing (which is what I figured the radiants might at least help) as well as outdoors since away from the shop area itself it's right drafty at best...
In short, I'd recommend a trial run by anybody before committing much $$ or hopes on these puppies in cold climates.
--
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On Tue, 03 Nov 2009 16:24:32 -0600, the infamous -MIKE-

Run away!
-- "To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical." -- Thomas Jefferson
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Walls are insulated, ceiling is not yet. It is a one 20 x 26 or so. Ceiling is 8' to beams, but open above with a pitched roof. I use a 30,000 Btu propane heater and don't even bother trying below about 20 degrees or so.
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On Thu, 5 Nov 2009 22:22:42 -0500, the infamous "Ed Pawlowski"

So slap up some OSB or drywall for a ceiling and rent a blower at the local BORG/hardware store and blow in a foot of cellulose. That's cheaper than paying another season's fuel bills.
Pad and carpet the floor for more comfort. <titter>
-- "To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical." -- Thomas Jefferson
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