new shop update

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Slab was poured as planned last Thursday, got all the totals for everything and come in slightly under budget at $2.60 sq ft. This included 75 tons stone for base, rebar for footing, prefab wire mats, sawing stress lines on 18' centers and some dirt work when the finishers cleaned up.
Slab turned out great, smooth without being glass slick(I'm too old to bust my ass on a damp spot.)
Block delivery is being held up by rain, should be able to get them in sometime next week.
basilisk
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Pictures, we want pictures. If there's no pictures, it didn't happen.
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On Fri, 10 Aug 2012 06:42:53 -0400, Dave wrote:

Here ya go, not much to see yet.
http://www.woodwrangler.net/newshop.html
basilisk
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basilisk wrote:

Saw the pictures of the "odd piece of pine". It IS odd, but nice looking. Reminds me of a restored house in Tifton, GA which belonged to a timber baron years ago. Each room is trimmed and the furniture is made of a different kind of wood. There was one room trimmed in curly pine. Never heard of it before or since. Will put a snapshot of a door of one of the cabinets on ABPW.
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That's gonna be one nice shop. ^5

I don't have a better explanation, than he does, for Basilisk's odd pine, but the curly pine in your ABPW pic is very similar to root ball lumber, where someone milled the root ball and/or a large enough tap root of the tree. Of course, one rarely gets lengthy lumber from this source. Turners like root ball wood for its figure, also. Red maple and ER cedar has really nice figured wood in their root balls. I've turned pine knots and the figure is often really nice... you don't know what's inside until you turn it.
Similarly: Here is a ER cedar jardinaire I made from tree trunks (ice storm damaged trees 25 yrs ago), where the curves are made by the wood having grown around where the limbs protruded, hence somewhat of how some figuring or the curly is produced. The limb's wood popped out of its "socket", pretty easily, leaving the surrounding curved wood intact. The cedar trees were about 60 yrs old, with trunks ranging from 24" to 40" in diameter. We cut the trees and were to burn the debris, but I reamed out one log section, with a chain saw, and it looked nice... I had previously made jardinaires with cypress stumps. The more I reamed, the better it looked, so I kept most of the log sections and polished them up. They've made for nice "furniture"/ decor pieces. http://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/7742403882/in/photostream
Sonny
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Sonny wrote:

Those are really beautiful!
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Thanks, but I tend to think they are actually not my work. They are nature's work. I just got lucky enough to exose their beauty, this way, at that time. During the process of reaming them out, I simply discovered what was there and it *happened (?) to be pretty darn nice. Then, I found a way to showcase them.
*To state nature "happened" to produce something, pretty darn nice, is a misnomer. Nature, IMO, seems to always produce something pretty darn nice.
The original 8 trees were lined in front of my grandparent's old home. Mom bought the homestead (from the family - she had 10 siblings), when her parents passed away. Today, only 2 of the original trees remain. Being taught to be nature minded, from an early age, I found it was like discovering the beauty of nature, not otherwise noticed, in one's own front yard.
Sonny
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ceiling too. :)
Will it be big enough for your needs?
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On Sun, 12 Aug 2012 22:32:54 -0400, Lee Michaels wrote:

All in good time, blocks should be delivered tomorrow.

At least for the foreseeable future, I have a barn across the drive from the new shop that will(and does already) serve for lumber storage and all the assorted lawnmowers, weedeaters, tillers and other stuff that shouldn't be in a wood working shop :) My sons atv work will remain banned to the barn.
basilisk
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Nothing to apologize for. You've got the base for an outstanding shop. That slab is about 2500 square feet. It should allow for a great sized shop. I for one will be very interested in seeing more pictures as it develops.
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On Tue, 14 Aug 2012 07:43:19 -0400, Dave wrote:

Will do.
Looks like block delivery is going to be held up until next week, it is unusually cool and wet this August, rained again yesterday and last night, more in the forecast for later this week.
What's needed is about 100 tons of gravel, but my ass is sore from crowbaring my wallet out for the slab.
basilisk
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On 8/12/2012 9:51 PM, basilisk wrote:

Awesome shop there basilisk! If it were me though, and I was building a woodshop, I'd like a wood floor on top of the cement, about 5" above so I could run dust collection and so on under it. I'd like the wood to be rustic, wide oak planks. I'd also like log walls... like a log cabin, just for the heck of it, with a nice pot belly somewhere.
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On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 11:05:57 -0400, Jack wrote:

I'm 100% with you on the looks and emotion part of log walls and wood floors, but the practical part of me requires it be as fireproof as possible.
Part of what I do is metal work, it doesn't mix well with wood floors.
Finally got most of the blocks delivered, except one load. It has rained 2 inches since Friday.
I have a mason lined up, he is not the cheapest or fastest but he does excellent work, he is trying to retire on me, but I squeezed on more job out of him. :)
basilisk
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On 8/19/2012 3:05 PM, basilisk wrote:

That's OK, the only thing my shop has on my above list is the pot belly, and it ain't a stove:-)

It would really be nice to be building an entire shop from scratch. All my shops have been fit into something already there. I'd probably go nuts trying to figure out exactly what I wanted... I'd call it the Bill syndrome. Mike knows what I mean...
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Built my original shop to 16x32 and it was roomy till I started buying tools. Got to where I couldn't go thru the shop without getting a bruise. Had to store my 3, 15 gallon gravity feed vessel all grain brewing system to make way for a band saw. Then added 10x12 add on to get chainsaws ect out of the shop. Finally added a 12 x 30 addition and still have storage problems. Planning on blatantly ripping off Swingman's storage ideas. I think you can drive yourself nuts trying to have a perfect plan. I tried planning and this and that and finally since everything is on wheels went out and moved things around. I have a basic plan but the most important things seems to be storage, jigs, supplies, fasteners ect. Doesn't matter how good yiour layout is if your storage relies on tool and bench top storage. Now if they can just get my left leg working again. Been doing physical therapy and it feels like I'm training for a marathon.
Mike M
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Lumber (and lots of miscellaneous stuff) storage and crowded by tools & work benches are my main issues, too. Additionally, with my shop still in the remodeling stage, all the dust collection is not yet in place, so cleaning up, in most areas, is an unpleasant additional job/inconvenience, in itself. This scenario is compounded when I have more than one project going at a time, i.e., another item to work around/avoid, which seems to continuously be the case.
As for as the rustic look of the shop decor, I've had the same sense for a long time. I have a start on that, though, with log posts as beam supports down the middle of the shop. I don't have too much concern with heating, so a pot belly stove is not on my wish list. I have thoughts of a porch swing under the backside overhang area, once all the lumber cache (mostly framing lumber & ply products, now) is either moved to the inside storage areas or used in the remodeling. I suppose, by the time I get the swing installed, I'll be too old and lazy, so it'll be time for me to just go sit and do nothing, anymore.
Sonny
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On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 20:40:36 -0700, Mike M wrote:

Biggest priority for me is to get everything in one building, my stationary tools are scattered between three buildings, jointer, planer, bandsaw is in one place, RAS is on porch at house, scroll saw is in dining room, drill press and wood lathe is in barn, welding equipment, additional drill press is in yet another building and mechanic tools are where ever there is a free hole to stick them. This has been unworkable for years.
There will be plenty of cabinetry and storage to build, I want to actually use the space to get a feel for where I want everything.
One of the first things I want to do is replace my tablesaw, the present saw is a '51 delta 8' saw that the motor and sheaves have been upgraded on, but has the original crappy fence.
basilisk
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Have you played with any setups to determine tool location? I'm thinking of something like the Grizzly workshop planner. http://www.grizzly.com/workshopplanner.aspx
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On Mon, 20 Aug 2012 10:07:43 -0400, Dave wrote:

Just drawings on paper, I'm going to play with Grizzly's planner a bit looks interesting.
I'm not going to make the locations of the machines permanent, at least not until I get a permanently installed dust collector.
I'm fortunate that I don't really need a dust "collector", but rather a large blower, sawdust and shavings can go in the woods directly behind the shop with no one but me being the wiser, it will all remain on my property so no harm no foul.
I have a good idea where the machinery will be for good work flow.
basilisk
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I started out with the Grizzly shop planner, and eventually moved over to Sketchup to get a good feel of how everything works. My shop is pretty much arranged how the winning plan worked out, and I'm happy with it. It was worth the time to set all this stuff up.
If you get in to Sketchup, be sure to check out the library for your various tools. Not all of them will be on there, but in my case about half of them were. If the tool wasn't in there, I just found something similar.
Puckdropper
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