Need input/ cedar drying box

I am thinking about building my wife a clothes drying box, something to hang shirts and other articles.
My thinking is that I can use cedar and build a 6' x 2' x 3' cabinet, incude two rods and a grate separating the cab. in half. I would put decorative vents on top and the two sides. I was also thinking of using the dryer exhaust as a hot air source, with the hot air being force into the bottom of the cabinet. Maybe even using a fan of sorts to help air circulation. Also, what if she used the dryer to dry as well as the cabinet. I wonder if the moisture from the main dryer would affect the clothes in the cabinet by not allowing them to dry.
My dryer vents into the basement in winter with a secondary lint trap.
Any ideas on this? Is this a functional idea, or would it be better to fork out the GRAND for the "real thing". By building the cabinet it would sure do wonders for my toy er I mean tool budget!
Searcher1
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I think running the working dryer into the box is a bad idea. I'd assume it will be adding a huge amount of humidity and really not work too well. However, you could probably find a disabled old dryer and pull out the heater and fan, and then you have a dedicated unit for less than the grand.
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wrote:

a good sized muffin fan and a small heating element should do the job plenty well- smaller and cheaper...
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Yes that too is what I figured, I do have a new fan /blower and heater I just need to get some ducting for the heater to the cabinet. Thanks Rich

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Tue, Dec 21, 2004, 11:28pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@burrverizon.net (Searcher) says: I am thinking about building my wife a clothes drying box, something to hang shirts and other articles. <anip>
Sounds to me like you're trying to fix what ain't broke. In my experience, hang a damp shirt up overnight, in the open, and it's dry in the morning. If you want it done faster, that's what a clothes drier is for. Bars to hook clothes hangers on would be a lot more inconspicuous when not being used. Hell, it's the laundry room, I doubt you're going to get many visitors there, so just some nails pounded in the rafters would do.
JOAT Sanity is vastly over-rated.
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On Wed, 22 Dec 2004 16:31:12 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

This depends strongly on where you live.

Around here you hang that shirt in the open for about an hour and it's dry -- at least in the summer time.
OTOH my sister, who lives in a place where the Banana Slug is the state animal, needs a lot more help to dry clothes. When we lived in Ireland we learned the value of a drying closet first hand.
--RC
"Sometimes history doesn't repeat itself. It just yells 'can't you remember anything I've told you?' and lets fly with a club. -- John W. Cambell Jr.
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Wed, Dec 22, 2004, 11:11pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@TAKEOUTmindspring.com says: <snip> Around here you hang that shirt in the open for about an hour andit's dry -- at least in the summer time. OTOH my sister, who lives in a place where the Banana Slug is the state animal, needs a lot more help to dry clothes. When we lived in Ireland we learned the value of a drying closet first hand.
When I said "in the open", I meant in the open in the house, as opposed to say, putting it in a closet.
I've never lived in Ireland, but I've lived in several other countries, and traveled in more, and in every one, you leave a wet shirt, or whatever, hanging in the open overnight (say from a shower rod), and it's dry next morning. The only "closets" I saw were for hanging clothes after they were dry. When you're traveling, works very well with a wash and wear suit, wash and wear shirt, change of socks and underwear. Makes for minimal hand baggage. Wash your suit, shirt, change of underwear and socks, every night, in your hotel bath or sink; then a couple of hangers, and a small piece of rope to hang them from. Carry the extras, along with your shaving gear, in one small handbag. No prob.
In places with cold winters, it's pretty standard to hang the clothes outside. Yep, they freeze, solid, but beat the ice out of them, let 'em warm up a bit, and they're dry. If you've ever brought in frozen stiff clothes, with a stiff wind blowing, and a way minus wind chill factor, you know why that isn't my first choice of drying methods. The big thing is, don't hang them out sopping wet, wring them out first. If they're too wet, you could break them, after they freeze.
JOAT Sanity is vastly over-rated.
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I like JT's thoughts even better, couple of nails ummm, bout a buck, 999 toward a Lathe and accesss, I like that!!!!!! Ummmm Hey Hon < iwas thinkin Ya got any nails?.....................................And where's that woodworking cataloge of mine?
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