Need a chainsaw chain for special cut....


Hi all,
I've been cutting up 2' long gum tree logs into quarters for a furnace, cutting along the grain, which is ok with a nice sharp chain. I was just wondering if there is a more specialized chain for such purposes?
Thanks
Dean
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It's called a rip chain.
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Yes, there are many types. I don' tknow the specifics, but a good dealer will. http://www.stihlusa.com/chainsaws/types.html
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There's no mention of rip chain on that stihl site. What there is is a bit confusing, what with the supper pico micro double half skip wibble wobble terminology they use.
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I bet that the local Stihl dealer would know what you want, and be able to set up your saw for the task.
Mine certainly does. Which is why he does such good business.
Patriarch
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Yeah, they call it a ripping chain or rip chain. Never seen one, don't know HOW it's different but it's definitely different.Everybody who sells one of those kits for turning logs into lumber with your chainsaw sells ripping chains or knows where you can get one. The Alaskan chain saw mill comes to mind.
I'd google on it for you but since I don't know what make and model saw you got, you're probably better for that. :-)
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Ripping chain is for the mills, and the mills _only_, as it's ground straight across and a bitch to hold cutting endgrain freehand.
Skip-tooth chain will clear long shavings better than standard, though rocking the cut will keep less bar in the groove, giving better shaving removal and higher possible speeds. Cut with bar nose down 30 degrees until halfway, then go to nose up on the near end of the log. Quickly even the center with the ends, and repeat.
DON'T PULL SHAVINGS OUT WITH THE SAW ON.
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I've had a rip chain for my Stihl 2 years now. I use it to rip the maple logs I get from neighbors for my lathe work. Never had a lick of trouble using it. The log is upright on the ground and I hold the bar at a 45 degree angle. No pushing of the saw through the wood I just pretty much let the weight of the saw do the work and it works like a charm.

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Thank you. Safety first!

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Am I misunderstanding something here? You're quartering the logs to burn them, right?
Why in the world would you rip them with a chainsaw when you can split them in much less than one quarter of the time spent ripping? Use a splitter, a splitting axe, or a wedge and sledge.
Either a troll or I'm missing something here....
H.
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H.
Its a gum tree. When I split them on the splitter, it just fragments into a tangled mess of shredded bits. All other wood I have been splitting fine, but this one is impossible. I have acquired a few gum trees that my neighbor has removed - supposedly it burns really well, and its very dense wood.
Dean
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FWIW, the saw I'm using is a stihl ms460 magnum
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Be careful burning gum, I find that I have to clean my chimney 2 times during the winter season when I burn it. Also I'd let it season for 2 seasons before burning it.
If your stove has a catalytic converter in it stay away from gum, it clogs them up really fast.
If you want something that burns really hot and lasts awhile get some locust, be careful though it gets mighty hot.
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dean wrote:

fire screen. Sweetgum (if that is what it is) pops and spits like a sack of firecrackers. And you are right, you can drive a wedge into it completely out of sight and it is like splitting plywood.
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Never split a gum tree eh? Hickory is nasty too. If it is larger diameter, I cut it down first and then split it.
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I have a whole pile of hickory too, although I have not split any of it yet, still waiting. Tell me up front, does it break up or shred or what?
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Hickory get stringy. You smack it with a maul and it will split at the top and leave interconnected strings all the way down. I've taken the chainsaw to the larger pieces. I've also have better luck cutting them down from the 16: that I use to half that. Like all wood, they split best after about week of below freezing temperatures.
The same characteristics that make it tough to split make it very good for tool handles.
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A very good point - one that I never realized until you said that.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I can't recall for sure if I have split Gum, but I think so...I worked as an arborist for several years, and we cut plenty of Gum, but I just can't remember if I split any of it. The memory is fading fast.
Now, recently I have split Hickory and Red Oak in abundance. As long as it's dry to begin with, I haven't had too many problems. If a wedge went through but fibers clung to any side of the split, it was easy just to pry them apart. Did a good bit of that just last weekend with a 3' dia. Red Oak. Usually I prefer to wait until cold weather to do this, but it was for a child's "camp-out" theme birthday party, so....
In sum: make sure the wood is dry (let it sit at least a year, try to keep it out of the rain), and work when it's cold.
H
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