My clever trick

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Sometimes when I write down a dimension on a plan, say the width of a piece, I might write 1-1/4" but what I actually mean is 1-1/4" minus the thickness of a stabilizer plus the difference between a full and thin kerf blade. Then if anyone steals my plan they will screw it up!
That's my story, and I'm sticking with it.
-Leuf
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ya nothing worse than a plan thief, wouldn't ya just like to get your hands on em and kill'em til they die from it. ross
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In a prior life I was a draftsman for a steel fabrication company (beams and columns for buildings). Once, just before I delivered a set of plans and shop drawings for approval my boss asked for the originals. He ran copies and then changed lots of numbers making many beans and columns a foot or two short and in some cases just an inch or two difference in bolt patterns, etc. He informed me that he had a suspicion that the customer was a fly by night operation.
Sure enough we delivered the drawings for approval and never head another word. A few weeks later there were piles of steel at the job site which was near our office. The small job should have had the steel erected in a day, maybe two. A few weeks later all the steel was gone and it was a few months before they showed up with a new pile.

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"SonomaProducts.com" wrote:

(beams and columns for buildings). Once, just before I delivered a set of plans and shop drawings for approval my boss asked for the originals. He ran copies and then changed lots of numbers making many beans and columns a foot or two short and in some cases just an inch or two difference in bolt patterns, etc. He informed me that he had a suspicion that the customer was a fly by night operation.
BTDT with machine tool electrical control systems.
When you suspected a customer, would leave out a couple of connections and/or cross wire a couple of circuits on the drawing.
This was specifically where we had supplied the design engineering as well as fabricating the panel.
Customer would get order for another machine, but no order for another panel.
Sooner or later, the call came, the service guy would hit the road.
Even back then, it was portal to portal, $750/day, 1/2 day ($500) minimum, + T&L expenses.
It woulld only happen once.
Those were some very expensive service calls.
Made enough on the service call to offset the profit on the panel.
Lew
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So, where exactly do you live?
Dave in Houston
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Rather than make confusing plans I simply put the dimensions on a different layer and not provide all the dimension layers. That way I do not have to worry about which measurements are correct and which are not. When I print my plans they include all the dimensions, my customers plans usually only have basic dimensions.
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I didn't think I was naive anymore, or maybe it's just because I've never done trade work, but I would have never imagined customers stealing your plans so they could build it themselves.
--
Mike
Watch for the bounce.
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Or they take the plans to a competitor and he gives a break because he does not have to design the project.
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I do the opposite. I quote extra high when somebody comes into my shop with a drawing from one of my brothers in arms. Very often I will see a drawing *I* will have made when I quoted the kitchen dealer who I normally supply. I end up looking at my own drawing. So I quote high. Then they go away just to see me show up to take a template. Quite funny... most of the time.
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Maybe you are young enough and clever enough to remember which dimensions are incorrect and what the proper dimensions are. I screw up often enough without building traps for myself. Falling into my own trap would be much more frustrating to me than having someone else profit from my work.
DonkeyHody "I'd rather expect the best from people and be wrong than expect the worst and be right."
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Okay apparently my attempt at humor has failed.
I had the thin kerf blade on the saw with stabilizers. You'd think that what with just having put it on 30 seconds earlier for the express purpose of having a thinner kerf in the piece of walnut I was ripping I would remember this fact. You'd think what with the splitter being green for the normal blade and yellow for the thin this would also be a good reminder not to use the scale on the fence. You'd think standing there looking at the gap between the fence and blade thinking "that doesn't look like 1-1/4" would be a further indication. But no, I cut it anyway.
In other words, I screwed up. Apparently I also suck at telling jokes. That's about how this week is going so far. And it's supposed to snow again tonight.
-Leuf
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Leuf wrote:

Just use the stabilizers on both blades and adjust the readout indicator on the fence then it should be correct for both. This might cause problems with the splitter alignment for the thicker blade, unless it too is adjustable.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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wrote:

Nope, with the tilt of my saw the arbor flange is on the opposite side from the fence so different blade thickness changes the measurement.
It's never messed me up before, but I haven't put the thin kerf on in long time. And I've never even looked at the scale on the fence with the dado on there.
-Leuf
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I thought it was great!
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wrote:

I got it the first time around. I figured that's exactly what happened.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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Leuf wrote:

Nope. Got it the first time (and liked it)...just didn't comment.
Chris
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I thought it was funny when I read it. I have had many helpers over the years that would do the same. They would measure something and then when it wouldn't fit, they would (sincerely) ask, "well, if you had cut on the XX side of the line it would have fit. I measure everything thinking you will be cutting from the XX side; so if it's wrong, it's not my fault".
I laughed pretty hard because it reminded me of that.
On the other hand, I have measured and cut material myself only to have it not fit. "What in the hell happened here?" I wonder. It is difficult when there is no one around to blame.
Kinda reminded me of that, too.
Robert
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On Tue, 25 Mar 2008 10:07:16 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

If all else fails, blame the tape measure. You know they put that little wiggly bit on the end just for that reason.
(and I do know what it's really for, honest)
-Leuf
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wrote:

I can't tell you how many times those two little rivets that hold on that little hook on the end of the tape measure hung up on the wood and gave me an erroneous reading resulting in a board that was cut too short. I bought all kinds of tape measures to try to remedy this and ended up with a lot of tape measures. I found that the bigger and brighter (neon colors) they are, there was less of this problem.
But after too many wasted boards and trips to the lumber yard to replace miscut boards, I have adopted a modified story stick approach. Particularly if the measurements are critical and the wood is expensive, I cut a peice of inexpensive "story stick stock". I then remeasure it once or twice and fit it to something to make sure it fits. I then use this story stick to make my critical measurement and cut. I will even use the story stick itself as cut guide.
That measuring tape is your enemy. Particulary for ageing eyes.
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*snip*
Sometimes I think those rivets are part of the problem. So what if you can't take an inside measurement without compensating for the hook? There are two sides to a standard tape, so make the hook 1/16" thick and have one side for outside measurements and one for inside measurements. By keeping the lines parallel (just offset) you still have the ability to check for square to another line.
When was the last time you measured the hook run out on YOUR tape measure? (I've never done it.)
Puckdropper
--
You can only do so much with caulk, cardboard, and duct tape.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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