Mortising with DP120

The Ryobi drill press model DP120 says it accepts a mortising attachment. I can not find anywhere on the ryobi web page the attachment and part number. Does Ryobi make a mortising attachment or does it accept another manufacturers mortising attachment?
I want to buy the DP 120 at Home Depot this weekend (20% off), but I don't want it if I can't find a mortising attachment that will fit on it.
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what kinda woods are you planing on mortising. reason I ask is that hard woods are a bear to machine with DP attachment mortisers. try some cherry or maple before making up your mind about the attachment. red oak isn't too bad with my Delta attachment. Maple; fuggetaboutit.
stoutman wrote:

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Thus far, most of my projects have been made of poplar or red oak (until I feel more comfortable then I will splurge for the expensive woods). Do you know if the DP120 will accept the delta mortise attachment?

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Stoutman,
it really doesn't matter what type of wood you are mortising (balsa a possible exception), or what type of drill press you have. DP mortisers are useless.
Don't take my word for it, use google and review the last ten years comments, I have yet to read a favourable post.
Greg

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Here's a good post that sums it up fairly well:
From: Doc ( snipped-for-privacy@capecod.net) Subject: Re: Dedicted Mortiser versus Drill Press & Attachment?
View this article only Newsgroups: rec.woodworking Date: 1998/11/05
Peter Shull wrote in message ...

is
Having started with a drill-press attachment and gone to a mortiser..
The drill-press attachment will drive you slowly nuts. Setup time (getting the fence-holddown square with the chisel and then setting up the depth of cut for a trial on scrap, then resetting everything...) , fiddling little adjustments and every now and then, it slips a touch and you're nailed: the mortises are at an angle, giving you a sharktooth looking hole and then you have to go through the whole setup process all over again.And again, and.... The slow feed rate you have to use with the drill press, etcetera, etcetera....
It is faster to use a brad-point or small Forstner bit in the drill press, with a quick and dirty fence (two C-clamps and a straight chunk of scrap) for doing just a few mortises, finishing with a good, sharp chisel.
By contrast, setting up a dedicated mortiser is quick, simple and easy. The chisel can be set square using the fence (just run the fence out to where it comes in contact with the chisel, turn the chisel till they are parallel, tighten chisel) ; depth adjustment is ultra simple (I use a few pieces of scrap of a known thickness under the depth rod). Feed rate is, at a rough guess, ten times as fast: you can do ten mortises on the dedicated mortiser in the time it takes for one with the drill-press attachment. Providing the attachment stays put, of course.
If you have a very few mortises to do, infrequently, maybe the attachment is worth having, maybe not. If you have many to do (after I had the attachment on for a week I got an order for a dozen tables, two mortises per leg, and that was just the initial order- I was on the phone, ordering the mortiser that afternoon) you will want the dedicated tool.
Also, to answer the original post in this thread, the mortiser I bought was (and is ) a Grizzly. Good tool. Like it better than the Delta a friend has (which I used before the DP attachment). The Grizzly chisels are okay in hardwood (red and white oak) and softwood (white pine) and quite inexpensive (about $10 each), cheap enough that I can think of them as disposable instead of sharpening.. Cheaper than the Delta as well. After over a thousand mortises, it's working just fine.Original chisels still working nicely too.
J.F. Milliken, Boatbuilder Cape Cod

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: The Ryobi drill press model DP120 says it accepts a mortising attachment. I : can not find anywhere on the ryobi web page the attachment and part number. : Does Ryobi make a mortising attachment or does it accept another : manufacturers mortising attachment? : : I want to buy the DP 120 at Home Depot this weekend (20% off), but I don't : want it if I can't find a mortising attachment that will fit on it. : The $20 mortising attachment from Harbor Freight fits on the Ryobi DP120. If you can't find the one from HF, I'll sell you mine for the $20 plus shipping. I use a forstner bit or my router for mortising these days -- not enough time left before the end of the world to monkey about with set-up & tear-down time for the attachment.
--
Steve
www.ApacheTrail.com/ww/
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Hmmmmm. I think I will save my money for a benchtop mortiser.
Thanks for the advice.

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