Mortising Question

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Thank you all for your responses.
I have never used a mortise machine before and didn't know what to exprect.
I'll be using a sharp chisel to clean the ring out of each mortise.
David.
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One more (maybe crazy) idea.
If you really need a flat bottom, then drill the mortise 3/8" extra deep. Mill some stock to 1/2" square. Cut 3/8 wafers and pound them into the mortise with a dao o glue underneath.
On Mar 17, 9:55 am, "David" <cosmosatnointerbaunspamdotcom> wrote:

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The flat bottom isn't a concern, the mortises are to receive 1/2" square metal spindles (hollow) and the ring that is left after drilling the mortise prevents the spindle from being fully inserted. (This a stair rail project)
The shoe (bottom rail) thickness is only 5/8" so I don't have a lot of room to play with.
The ring that is the problem would also prevent the 1/2" slugs from being pounded to the required depth.
The general consensus here is that the mortises are correct and while time consuming, chiseling out the offending ring seems to be the solution.
Thanks for your response,
David.

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On Mar 17, 4:29 pm, "David" <cosmosatnointerbaunspamdotcom> wrote:

It'd be far faster to cut the spindles. Since they're hollow, presumably aluminum or thinwall steel, it's no big deal.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

I f you absolutely must have the flat bottom then use a thinner piece and cut a through mortise. When that is done, glue a thin piece across the bottom to close off the square holes.
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That is a good idea.
Getter yet, rip a grove with a dado blade down to the finished deptth of the mortises and fill the groove with additional stock.
Depending on the design this may be a bit more hidden.
-Steve
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He could also cut the mortices with a router and a spiral or morticing bit. Then square the resulting mortice with a chisel and he'd have a flat bottom square mortice the depth that he wanted.
--
Charley




"John Siegel" < snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
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Thanks for those suggestions, but as I previously posted a flat bottom on the mortise isn't my concern.
David.
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David wrote:

True But going all the way through should eliminate all artifacts leaving just a clean, square hole. Any tear out on the exit side is covered by the bottom piece.
BTW There is another old way to do this but since you have a mortiser I suggested the above. You can start with pieces as thich as half the width that you want and cut grooves with a dado blade. Then glue the two halves together to make your clean square holes.
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John, you make some good suggestions.
Originally, I just wanted to know if the mortise was what I should expect it to be.
Having never used a dedicated mortiser before, I was concerned I was missing something in the set up that was causing the collar(ring) at the outer edges of the mortise.
Your suggestions would definitely avoid the problem I was having, if I had a little more fore-thought I may have chosen a different method for the mortises.
Thanks for the input and ideas,
David.
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On Mar 18, 12:39 pm, "David" <cosmosatnointerbaunspamdotcom> wrote:

I'm at a loss as to what you're really trying to accomplish. You're working on a stair railing. Stairs are inclined, the railing is inclined, the bottom of the hole will be inclined. If you use a mortising machine the uphill end of the mortise will be where the interference occurs. The spindles are metal. Cut the spindles on an angle. You don't have to worry about having insufficient tenon length compromising the strength of the railing. The mortise will hide the cut edges. This will be far faster than trying to work inside a mortise.
Unless there is some other consideration you haven't mentioned, you seem to be making this needlessly complex.
R
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Hi Rico,
Having no experience with a dedicated mortiser all I originally wanted to know was if the mortise I was getting, was to be expected, if there was something in the bit and chisel setup that would avoid the collar (ring) that I was getting at the outer edge of the mortise.
http://i16.tinypic.com/2ms1303.jpg
It has been pointed out that this is to be expected when producing a single 1/2" mortise with a 1/2" mortising chisel.
The shoe stock is 5/8" thick, I was hoping to drill a 3/8" depth mortise and be able to insert the spindle 3/8" into the mortise. The collar (ring) which is left after drilling stands proud of the bottom of the mortise, preventing the spindle from being inserted the full 3/8".
It has been suggested to chisel out the collar to achieve my required depth and although time consuming, is a solution.
I have both flat run and inclined railings on this project.
The inclined pieces of shoe rail and hand rail I will mortise on the angle (51) and cut the bottom/top of the spindles to match.
I may opt to only insert the spindles 1/4" into the shoe rail and then insert deeper into the hand rail to take up the difference.
I apologize for the confusion. I hope this clears it up.
Thanks for the replies,
David.
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