Mortising attachment for a drill press

Page 2 of 2  
" If you have a short 3 handle drill press don't do it."
When I built my woodworking drill press table for my Rigid floor-mounted press, I found the Long Arms interfered with the table!
As a result, I discovered how simple it was to re-fit the press with shorter arms.
Thus, I would not think a short-arm drill press was necessarily an obstacle to employing a mortising attachment - maybe all you need do is retro-fit a longer arm or two.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/20/2015 8:59 PM, Dick Snyder wrote:

If these are cabinet doors you would be better off making stub tenons to fit in slots. Far Simpler and fine for that weight door.
You would probably be better off with a bench top mortiser, they can be had for not much more than the attachments for a DP and far simpler to set up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Dick Snyder" wrote:

--------------------------------------------------------------- My personal prejudices:
1) Drill Press & Attachment May a constipated camel decorate your front lawn. IMHO, strictly a loser.
2) Plunge router & Jig. My weapon of choice.
You can knock out 40-50 mortises in a short amount of time.
I leave the ends of the mortise round and knock off the corners of the tenon with a flat bastard file.
3) Dedicated bench top mortising machine. You have enough work to justify the expense of a dedicated tool.
HTH
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/21/2015 12:29 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

The router and jig is something I had not considered yet. Could you give me some idea what your jig is like or send me a picture?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://tinyurl.com/cvnku9
"Dick Snyder" wrote:

------------------------------------------------------ http://tinyurl.com/cvnku9
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/21/2015 11:40 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Excellent. Thanks Lew.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/21/2015 11:30 AM, Dick Snyder wrote:

Here's one I used for making chairs years back, well before I got a multi-router.
I made it so I could use simple shims for different size stock. Simple, no moving parts, used in a vice:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopShopmadeMortiseJig?noredirect=1
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

"Dick Snyder" wrote:

-------------------------------------------------- SFWIW
Took a piece of 8 by 8 graph paper and attached it to 1/4" hardboard with rubber cement.
The 8x8 grid made set ups a snap.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I have a Mortise Pal, though I don't think they're available anymore.
http://www.rockler.com/how-to/mortise-pal-mortising-jig-clamps-easy-plunge-router-table-joint-cutting/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, April 20, 2015 at 8:59:47 PM UTC-5, southborough_man wrote:

In addition to the information in the other replies, there is this. IF you have a mortising attachment for your drill press, and it is not EXACTLY fitted to the spindle, it can come lose and start spinning. That gets really interesting, extremely fast.
BTW, don't ask me how I know. ;-)
Ergo, a dedicated mortiser is the only way to go. Or you could cut them by hand, which is the way I cut most of mine.
Deb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dick Snyder wrote:

Comments 1. If you kreg it, forget plugs, use filler. 2. Routers can make mortices 3. Half laps are strong 4. Dowels work too. Too much precision? Glue into rails, glue rails into sloppy big holes in stiles using filled epoxy.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/21/2015 7:20 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Filler is always a bad choice, it shrinks, it's a pain to sand. Either too hard or too soft.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"woodchucker" wrote:

----------------------------------------------- Epoxy fairing putty (epoxy thickened with micro-balloons) does NOT shrink and is of uniform hardness.
Can't comment on other fillers.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dadiOH wrote:

I make my own plugs. Get a dowel that fits and cut it into 6" lengths, put some glue on the DOWEL and tap it into the hole. Later saw it off with a flush-cut saw and use the other end. Cut the leftover in half with a scroll saw and use the two halves. If you put the glue in the hole it will gum up the screw and make it difficult to remove if you ever need to do so. (As I just had to do to replace a hand rail.)
--
G W Ross

Imagination is more important than
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/22/2015 11:02 PM, G. Ross wrote:

I don't often use plugs, but I make my own with a simple jig. Make a pocket hole in a piece of scrap, insert a dowel a bit longer than the hole, then I use my disk sander to sand off the excess. Also, drill a hole in the other end of the jig to pop out the dowel filler. Works like a charm if you need fillers. Typically, I don't use pocket holes where they show.
--
Jack
Add Life to your Days not Days to your Life.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, just to add to what everyone else has said, I think it depends on what else you expect to do in woodworking. If you intend it to be a continuing hobby, this project probably justifies buying a dedicated mortise machine, which you will likely use fairly often.
Apropos of the drill press attachment, I'd be sceptical. The weak point of mortising machines is the holddown (which stops the workpiece lifting when you retract the chisel), from what I've seen these are rudimentary or non-existant on drill press attachments. Also, as woodchucker mentioned, it takes a fair bit of force to push the chisel into the wood, and the handle on a drillpress doesn't give you much leverage for that.
So my suggestion here would be, if you'll do more mortises in future, buy a benchtop mortising machine. If not, build a dedicated jig and use the router.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/21/2015 11:39 AM, John McCoy wrote:

Lew posted a nice reference to a jig that would work with a plunge router. If I don't go with Kreg, I will make that jig which seems pretty straightforward. Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I started out with a DP attachment for a Delta 17-900. It worked, but I wouldn't use it for production. Lubricating the bit and honing the chisel was required for best operation. It's not difficult to add a cheater to the DP handle if necessary for additional leverage.
I then picked up a General International benchtop unit. It worked better, albeit still a bit underpowered; better holddown than the DP attachment.
I then picked up a horizontal mortiser from Laguna. The best of the bunch, especially for production.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, April 20, 2015 at 9:59:47 PM UTC-4, southborough_man wrote:

If you have a router table you should get a rail and stile router bit set.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.